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If I have a dataframe like this:

neu <- data.frame(test1 = c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14), 
                  test2 = c("a","b","a","b","c","c","a","c","c","d","d","f","f","f"))
neu
   test1 test2
1      1     a
2      2     b
3      3     a
4      4     b
5      5     c
6      6     c
7      7     a
8      8     c
9      9     c
10    10     d
11    11     d
12    12     f
13    13     f
14    14     f

and I would like to select only those values where the level of the factor test2 appears more than let's say three times, what would be the fastest way?

Thanks very much, didn't really find the right answer in the previous questions.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Find the rows using:

z <- table(neu$test2)[table(neu$test2) >= 3] # repeats greater than or equal to 3 times

Or:

z <- names(which(table(neu$test2)>=3))

Then subset with:

subset(neu, test2 %in% names(z))

Or:

neu[neu$test2 %in% names(z),]
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Thx that really helped a lot! –  Miri Putzig May 16 '13 at 11:53
    
Why use as.list? Why two table(.)? And it's better not to use subset. –  Arun May 16 '13 at 11:58
    
See alternative strategies above. –  Thomas May 16 '13 at 12:48
1  
@PatrickT subset uses non-standard evaluation, so it can produce unexpected results. For example, if you use it inside a function, it will typically not work right or at all. Best advice is to use [ for all extraction. –  Thomas Dec 9 at 12:50
1  
@PatrickT, at the time I was probably influenced by this post‌​. While there are some valid points there, I don't see a reason not to use, as long as you know what you're doing. I tend to avoid suggesting "never use this/that" these days. –  Arun Dec 9 at 12:51

Here's another way:

 with(neu, neu[ave(seq(test2), test2, FUN=length) > 3, ])

#   test1 test2
# 5     5     c
# 6     6     c
# 8     8     c
# 9     9     c
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+1 this is by far the best base solution to me. –  Arun May 17 '13 at 9:36

I'd use count from the plyr package to perform the counting:

library(plyr)
count_result = count(neu, "test2")
matching = with(count_result, test2[freq > 3])
with(neu, test1[test2 %in% matching])
[1] 5 6 8 9
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Awesome, thx a lot you guys –  Miri Putzig May 16 '13 at 11:57

The (better scaling) data.table way:

library(data.table)
dt = data.table(neu)

dt[dt[, .I[.N >= 3], by = test2]$V1]

Note: hopefully, in the future, the following simpler syntax will be the fast way of doing this:

dt[, .SD[.N >= 3], by = test2]

(c.f. Subset by group with data.table)

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