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Here's the object that's returned. I ultimately need to get two things: @token and @expires_at. How would I get them from this?

@my_object = access_token(params[:provider])

Then outputs:

#<OAuth2::AccessToken:0x007fd03df75db8 
   @client=#<OAuth2::Client:0x007fd035040ad0 
      @id="123xyz", 
      @secret="xyz123", 
      @site="https://graph.facebook.com", 
      @options={
         :authorize_url=>"/oauth/authorize", 
         :token_url=>"oauth/access_token", 
         :token_method=>:post, 
         :connection_opts=>{
            :ssl=>{
               :ca_file=>"ca-bundle.crt"
            }
         }, 
         :connection_build=>nil, 
         :max_redirects=>5, 
         :raise_errors=>true, 
         :mode=>:query, 
         :param_name=>"access_token", 
         :parse=>:query
      }, 
      @auth_code=#<OAuth2::Strategy::AuthCode:0x007fd035040c88 
         @client=#<OAuth2::Client:0x007fd035040ad0 ...>>, 
         @connection=#<Faraday::Connection:0x007fd037aec978 
            @headers={"User-Agent"=>"Faraday v0.8.7"}, 
            @params={}, 
            @options={}, 
            @ssl={:ca_file=>"ca-bundle.crt"}, 
            @parallel_manager=nil, 
            @default_parallel_manager=nil, 
            @builder=#<Faraday::Builder:0x007fd037aeca68 
               @handlers=[Faraday::Request::UrlEncoded, Faraday::Adapter::NetHttp]>, 
               @url_prefix=#<URI::HTTPS:0x007fd037aecf90 URL:https://graph.facebook.com/>, 
                  @proxy=nil, 
                  @app=#<Faraday::Request::UrlEncoded:0x007fd037aeb3c0 
                     @app=#<Faraday::Adapter::NetHttp:0x007fd037aeb370 
                        @app=#<Proc:0x007fd037aeb2a8@/gems/faraday-0.8.7/lib/faraday/connection.rb:87 (lambda)>>>>>, 
                        @token="token_123", 
                        @refresh_token=nil, 
                        @expires_in=5149095, 
                        @expires_at=1373851292, 
                        @options={
                           :mode=>:query, 
                           :header_format=>"Bearer %s", 
                           :param_name=>"access_token"
                        }, 
                        @params={:token_url=>"oauth/access_token"}>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit it should actually be

@my_object.token

and

@my_object.expires_at

I found out by re-indenting your object dump like this:

#<OAuth2::AccessToken:0x007fd03df75db8 
  @client=#<OAuth2::Client:0x007fd035040ad0 
    @id="123xyz", 
    @secret="xyz123", 
    @site="https://graph.facebook.com", 
    @options={
      :authorize_url=>"/oauth/authorize", 
      :token_url=>"oauth/access_token", 
      :token_method=>:post, 
      :connection_opts=>{
        :ssl=>{
          :ca_file=>"ca-bundle.crt"
        }
      }, 
      :connection_build=>nil, 
      :max_redirects=>5, 
      :raise_errors=>true, 
      :mode=>:query, 
      :param_name=>"access_token", 
      :parse=>:query
    }, 
    @auth_code=#<OAuth2::Strategy::AuthCode:0x007fd035040c88 
      @client=#<OAuth2::Client:0x007fd035040ad0 ...>
    >, 
    @connection=#<Faraday::Connection:0x007fd037aec978 
      @headers={"User-Agent"=>"Faraday v0.8.7"}, 
      @params={}, 
      @options={}, 
      @ssl={:ca_file=>"ca-bundle.crt"}, 
      @parallel_manager=nil, 
      @default_parallel_manager=nil, 
      @builder=#<Faraday::Builder:0x007fd037aeca68 
        @handlers=[Faraday::Request::UrlEncoded, Faraday::Adapter::NetHttp]
      >, 
      @url_prefix=#<URI::HTTPS:0x007fd037aecf90 URL:https://graph.facebook.com/>, 
      @proxy=nil, 
      @app=#<Faraday::Request::UrlEncoded:0x007fd037aeb3c0 
        @app=#<Faraday::Adapter::NetHttp:0x007fd037aeb370 
          @app=#<Proc:0x007fd037aeb2a8@/gems/faraday-0.8.7/lib/faraday/connection.rb:87 (lambda)>
        >
      >
    >
  >, 
  @token="token_123", 
  @refresh_token=nil, 
  @expires_in=5149095, 
  @expires_at=1373851292, 
  @options={
    :mode=>:query, 
    :header_format=>"Bearer %s", 
    :param_name=>"access_token"
  }, 
  @params={:token_url=>"oauth/access_token"}
>
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3  
Because an object have attributes don't imply in having accessors. Your question gets on the right end by the wrong way. –  fotanus May 16 '13 at 12:41
    
You're right, but why would SomeObject.to_s include instance vars that are not accessible? –  Patrick Oscity May 16 '13 at 15:30
    
I don't know, I'm not used to declare to_s in my objects, and since this is the default behavior it is not reliable. However it is ok to avoid looking at the documentation by guessing that it is readable, I also do this. Yet it is not a secure way when you have doubts like the OP. –  fotanus May 16 '13 at 15:59
    
Instance variables are never accessible and they are always included in the default pretty print. –  Jörg W Mittag May 16 '13 at 16:00
    
As i said you're both right, i found the solution by accident, going the wrong path. This is why i upvoted @grotori's answer. –  Patrick Oscity May 16 '13 at 16:07

Based on this you should be able to access them by:

@my_object.token
@my_object.expires_at
share|improve this answer
    
Your approach is the better one, +1 –  Patrick Oscity May 16 '13 at 15:31
    
@padde Thank you! –  Lazarus Lazaridis May 16 '13 at 18:21

As @grotori pointed out, you should be looking at the documentation instead of the object to define how to access the object attributes.

Note that an instance variable from an object is usually printed along with the object, but this doesn't mean that it is in the class expected interface.

For example:

class A
  def initialize
    @foo = 'bar'
  end
end
 => nil 

# Have the @foo attribute
A.new
 => <A:0xa232904 @foo="bar">

# Can't access it
p A.new.foo
NoMethodError: undefined method `foo' for #<A:0xa230280 @foo="bar">
share|improve this answer
    
Not having accessors doesn't mean you can't get to them. A.new.instance_variable_get(:@foo) The reason you couldn't get to it is because your method called initalize was never called. I think you must have meant initialize rather than initilize, so you got nil. –  vgoff May 16 '13 at 21:03
    
@vgoff of course, in ruby you can even execute private methods. Editing my answer to reflect that. However you don't want to access hidden instance variables or private attributes when dealing with an external lib, do you? –  fotanus May 16 '13 at 22:32
    
Was hoping you fixed your initalize method to be named what it needs to bee named so that the .new method would invoke it when it is called. –  vgoff May 17 '13 at 3:09
    
@vgoff sorry, thanks. Fixed. Yet, the answer is the same. –  fotanus May 17 '13 at 19:06
1  
Fair enough. Though not having the accessor named foo doesn't mean you can't access them. It just means that you have to use another mechanism. I guess my only issue is the comment containing "can't access it" when it is misleading. You simply can't call A.new.foo and expect to not get the error. –  vgoff May 17 '13 at 19:18

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