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I am trying to learn more CSS. I inherited a nice layout that I have been using for a little while now and I want to keep the CSS going instead of mixing tables in there. I am currently designing a separate form to handle side by side textboxes. I was using span tags to keep these textboxes side by side but now I'm wondering what the best practice for this type of design would be. Should I use a div container and spans as I was doing or should I just use straight divs and float them as in my example?

<div style="overflow:hidden; width:100%; border:1px solid #000;">
  <div>
    <div style="float:left"><input type="text" /></div>
    <div style="float:right"><input type="text" /></div>
  </div>

  <div style="clear:left">
    <div><input type="text" /></div>
  </div>
</div>
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As far as markup choices are concerned, it is always a good hint to test your page in a text browser (Lynx, Links, Elinks), and check how it is displayed there. I am usually using some kind of list (ul, ol or dl) for my forms.

Don’t forget to checkout A List Apart’s Prettier Accessible Forms article, which gives a good start for styling forms.

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Thanks for the link igor. I will read that. –  Jim Nov 1 '09 at 23:33

I'm not entirely sure what you're trying to achieve in terms of layout, but you can get the same result using a lot less markup:

  <div style="overflow:hidden; width:100%; border:1px solid #000;">
    <div>
      <input type="text" style="float:left" /><input type="text" style="float:right" />
    </div>
    <div style="clear:left">
      <input type="text" />
    </div>
  </div>

Make sure you move those in-line styles into class or id definitions too. Avoid having css definitions in your markup.

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Thanks Baynard, I didn't know I could float the input boxes. :) All I am trying to do is have 3 rows. The first row should have 2 textboxes side by side. The second row should have a single textbox aligned left and the last row will hold a submit button. –  Jim Nov 1 '09 at 23:32
    
For this specific case, you could do something like this: <ul> <li><input .../></li> <li class="special"><input .../></li> <li><input .../></li> <li><button type="submit">...</button></li> </ul> … and style it with CSS: ul { position: relative; } li.special { top: 0; right: 0; text-align: right; } You should really consider adding labels, though. (But again, I don‘t know everything of your specific case.) –  igor Nov 1 '09 at 23:38
    
ooops… forgot the CSS rule "position: absolute" for li.special ;-) –  igor Nov 1 '09 at 23:38
    
Igor, thanks for the markup. I also just downloaded lynx and the site looks good there. As far as the form goes, and correct me if I'm wrong, but I want to have the label above the textboxes. Would the ul tag still work for this? –  Jim Nov 1 '09 at 23:43
1  
No, it should work perfect as I described it. I just set up a quick test page to demonstrate it to you: obda.net/stackoverflow/form-test.html –  igor Nov 2 '09 at 0:13

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