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My error lies in the public static void main(String[] args) procedure. When I choose option 1 or 2 neither excecutes. It skips the if statements and continue with what follows in main. It looks like no value us added to option. Any help maybe?

 import java.util.Scanner;
 import java.io.BufferedReader;
 import java.io.FileReader;
 import java.io.IOException;

 public class ColTrans {
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    String original = "";
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Choose an option: (1) or (2) ");
    System.out.println("1. Type text to encrypt and decrypt: ");
    System.out.println("2. Read a file to encrypt and decrypt: ");
    String option = input.nextLine();
    if (option == "2")
    {
    original = readEntireFile("C:/Projek/Textfile.txt");
    }
    if (option == "1")
    {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter the text");
        original = scan.nextLine();
    }
    String ori=original.replaceAll("\\W", "");
    ori = ori.toUpperCase();
    String enc = colencrypt(ori);
    System.out.println("The encrypted text is: "+ enc);
    String dec = coldecrypt(enc);
    System.out.println("The encrypted text is: "+ dec);

    }



    private static String readEntireFile(String filename) throws IOException
{
    FileReader in = new FileReader(filename);
    StringBuilder contents = new StringBuilder();
    char[] buffer = new char[4096];
    int read = 0;
    do 
    {
        contents.append(buffer, 0, read);
        read = in.read(buffer);
    }
    while (read >= 0);
    return contents.toString();
    } 


static String colencrypt(String text) 
{
    String result = "";
    text = text.toUpperCase();
    int length = text.length();
    int rows = length/5;
    if ((length % 5) != 0)
      rows = rows + 1;
    char [][] b =new char[rows][5];
    char [][] c =new char[5][rows];
    char [] d = new char[length];

    int k = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
        for(int j = 0; j < 5; j++)
            {
                if ( k >= length )
                    b[i][j] = 'Z';
                else
                {
                d[k] = text.charAt(k);
                b[i][j] = d[k];
                }
                k++;
            }
    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        for(int j = 0; j < rows; j++)
            {
                c[i][j] = b[j][i];
                result = result + c[i][j];
            }
return result;
    }

static String coldecrypt(String cipher) 
{
    String result = "";
    cipher = cipher.toUpperCase();
    int length = cipher.length();
    int rows = length/5;
    if ((length % 5) != 0)
      rows = rows + 1;

    for(int k=0; k<rows; k++)
        for(int i=k; i<length; i=i+rows)
            {
            result=result+cipher.charAt(i);
            }

    return result;
    }
    }
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marked as duplicate by Jon Skeet, Andy Thomas, Arun P Johny, Thilo, Reimeus May 16 '13 at 13:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Use equals() method to compare two Strings.. –  Vasu May 16 '13 at 13:14
    
use if (option.equals("2")) instead of ==. Or if java 7, there is String switch... –  vikingsteve May 16 '13 at 13:16
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4 Answers

You cant compare strings like so: if(option == "2") you must use the .equals() method like so: if(option.equals("2"))

Hope that fixes it for you.

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You should compare it using option.equals("2");:

String option = input.nextLine();
if (option.equals("2"))
{
   ...
}

But if you expect an integer, you can also parse it: Integer.parseInt(option). This way would be more elegant and you could use a switch on the choices of the user. Be careful though that parseInt() might return an exception that you need to catch. For instance:

int option;
boolean validChoice = false;

while (!validChoice)
{
    try {
        option = Integer.parseInt(input.nextLine());
        if (option > 0 && option < 3) // This way you can verify that the number is valid!
        {
            validChoice = true;
        } else {
            System.out.println("The number must be (1) or (2)!");
        }
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        System.out.println("You must enter a number!");
    }
}
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In Java, you cannot compare String by using ==. That checks to see if the strings are the same object reference. To check the "value" of each string and if it compares, you can use the String.equals().

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Change your if statements to use

options.contains("1") 

and

options.contains("2")

instead of the == sign.

share|improve this answer
    
Contains allows for a string like 21 to be true for both options. If you need a very specific number, contains might lead to weird results if you fat finger some of the input. –  Walls May 16 '13 at 17:58
    
Yaeh this is true, I realise that now! Thanks, .equals is the way to go! –  Steven Jennings May 17 '13 at 12:28
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