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The scenario is that there are n objects, of different sizes, unevenly spread over m buckets. The size of a bucket is the sum of all of the object sizes that it contains. It now happens that the sizes of the buckets are varying wildly.

What would be a good algorithm if I want to spread those objects evenly over those buckets so that the total size of each bucket would be about the same? It would be nice if the algorithm leaned towards less move size over a perfectly even spread.

I have this naïve, ineffective, and buggy solution in Ruby.

buckets = [ [10, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1], [5, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 1, 1], [2] ]

avg_size = buckets.flatten.reduce(:+) / buckets.count + 1

large_buckets = buckets.take_while {|arr| arr.reduce(:+) >= avg_size}.to_a

large_buckets.each do |large|
  smallest = buckets.last

  until ((small_sum = smallest.reduce(:+)) >= avg_size)
    break if small_sum + large.last >= avg_size
    smallest << large.pop
  end

  buckets.insert(0, buckets.pop)
end

=> [[3, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3], [2, 1, 2, 3, 3], [10, 4], [5, 5]]
share|improve this question
    
I thought we could ask about algorithms here, it's in the FAQ. Why all the down votes? –  Jonas Elfström May 16 '13 at 13:35
    
it might be more suited to programmers.stackexchange.com –  georgesl May 16 '13 at 13:47
1  
Isn't this a known NP-Complete problem? It would probably be helpful if you disclose the range of n, m, and object sizes you're looking at, as well as your definition of a "good algorithm" (up to X% difference between final buckets, or moving at most Y% objects, or complexity at most O(n³) etc) so people can take a look at what's feasible and what's not, and what's optimum for what you want. –  i Code 4 Food May 20 '13 at 3:42
    
n is in the 193 to 1616 range and m is in the 4 to 10 range. I can accept 10% difference. I hope to move less than 25% of the total size (it's more about size than about objects). –  Jonas Elfström May 20 '13 at 8:36
1  
@Arthur Yes, it's NP-hard. Re Knuth: the Don, with exceptions like Algorithm X, writes about algorithms for problems known to be solvable in polynomial time, of which there are quite a lot but nothing like the variety of NP-hard problems. For NP-hard problems, the most one realistically can hope for is known techniques for solving related problems. –  David Eisenstat May 22 '13 at 0:54
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7 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+150

I believe this is a variant of the bin packing problem, and as such it is NP-hard. Your answer is essentially a variant of the first fit decreasing heuristic, which is a pretty good heuristic. That said, I believe that the following will give better results.

  • Sort each individual bucket in descending size order, using a balanced binary tree.
  • Calculate average size.
  • Sort the buckets with size less than average (the "too-small buckets") in descending size order, using a balanced binary tree.
  • Sort the buckets with size greater than average (the "too-large buckets") in order of the size of their greatest elements, using a balanced binary tree (so the bucket with {9, 1} would come first and the bucket with {8, 5} would come second).
  • Pass1: Remove the largest element from the bucket with the largest element; if this reduces its size below the average, then replace the removed element and remove the bucket from the balanced binary tree of "too-large buckets"; else place the element in the smallest bucket, and re-index the two modified buckets to reflect the new smallest bucket and the new "too-large bucket" with the largest element. Continue iterating until you've removed all of the "too-large buckets."
  • Pass2: Iterate through the "too-small buckets" from smallest to largest, and select the best-fitting elements from the largest "too-large bucket" without causing it to become a "too-small bucket;" iterate through the remaining "too-large buckets" from largest to smallest, removing the best-fitting elements from them without causing them to become "too-small buckets." Do the same for the remaining "too-small buckets." The results of this variant won't be as good as they are for the more complex variant because it won't shift buckets from the "too-large" to the "too-small" category or vice versa (hence the search space will be smaller), but this also means that it has much simpler halting conditions (simply iterate through all of the "too-small" buckets and then halt), whereas the complex variant might cause an infinite loop if you're not careful.

The idea is that by moving the largest elements in Pass1 you make it easier to more precisely match up the buckets' sizes in Pass2. You use balanced binary trees so that you can quickly re-index the buckets or the trees of buckets after removing or adding an element, but you could use linked lists instead (the balanced binary trees would have better worst-case performance but the linked lists might have better average-case performance). By performing a best-fit instead of a first-fit in Pass2 you're less likely to perform useless moves (e.g. moving a size-10 object from a bucket that's 5 greater than average into a bucket that's 5 less than average - first fit would blindly perform the movie, best-fit would either query the next "too-large bucket" for a better-sized object or else would remove the "too-small bucket" from the bucket tree).

share|improve this answer
    
This should give a more even spread but at the cost of more moves. It does not seem worth it, in my scenario. –  Jonas Elfström May 20 '13 at 8:07
    
@Jonas Elfström in the case of the simpler Pass2 the number of moves would actually be somewhat reduced as a result of performing a best-fit instead of a first-fit - the first-fit algorithm may moves buckets from the "too-small" to the "too-large" category or vice-versa (which may result in your reprocessing the bucket and in the worst case may result in the bucket repeatedly switching categories in an infinite loop), while the best-fit algorithm will not. The more complex Pass2 would almost certainly perform more moves, however. –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot May 20 '13 at 13:24
    
@Jonas Elfström For example, with first-fit you may have a too-small bucket that's 5 less than the average, and it moves a size-10 object from a too-large bucket that's 5 greater than the average, so you've performed a useless move (and depending on your termination conditions, you may continually perform this useless move in an infinite loop as you repeatedly swap the object between buckets). The best-fit algorithm would simply remove the too-small bucket from the bucket list rather than perform a useless move, and would then terminate if there are no more too-small buckets to process. –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot May 20 '13 at 13:33
    
My implementation does not ever move anything from the small buckets so an infinite loop should not occur. –  Jonas Elfström May 20 '13 at 13:39
    
I now see how this more complex algorithm could save moves. Thanks for the explanation! –  Jonas Elfström May 20 '13 at 13:40
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I ended up with something like this.

  • Sort the buckets in descending size order.
  • Sort each individual bucket in descending size order.
  • Calculate average size.
  • Iterate over each bucket with a size larger than average size.
  • Move objects in size order from those buckets to the smallest bucket until either the large bucket is smaller than average size or the target bucket reaches average size.

Ruby code example

require 'pp'

def average_size(buckets)
  (buckets.flatten.reduce(:+).to_f / buckets.count + 0.5).to_i
end

def spread_evenly(buckets)
  average = average_size(buckets)
  large_buckets = buckets.take_while {|arr| arr.reduce(:+) >= average}.to_a

  large_buckets.each do |large_bucket|
    smallest_bucket = buckets.last
    smallest_size = smallest_bucket.reduce(:+)
    large_size = large_bucket.reduce(:+)

    until (smallest_size >= average)
      break if large_size <= average
      if smallest_size + large_bucket.last > average and large_size > average
        buckets.unshift buckets.pop
        smallest_bucket = buckets.last
        smallest_size = smallest_bucket.reduce(:+)
      end
      smallest_size += smallest_object = large_bucket.pop
      large_size -= smallest_object
      smallest_bucket << smallest_object
    end

    buckets.unshift buckets.pop if smallest_size >= average
  end
  buckets
end

test_buckets = [ 
  [ [10, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1], [5, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 1, 1], [2] ],
  [ [4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1], [10, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 3, 3], [6] ],
  [ [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1] ],
  [ [10, 9, 8, 7], [6, 5, 4], [3, 2], [1] ],
]

test_buckets.each do |buckets|
  puts "Before spread with average of #{average_size(buckets)}:"
  pp buckets
  result = spread_evenly(buckets)
  puts "Result and sum of each bucket:"
  pp result
  sizes = result.map {|bucket| bucket.reduce :+}
  pp sizes
  puts
end

Output:

Before spread with average of 12:
[[10, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1], [5, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 1, 1], [2]]
Result and sum of each bucket:
[[3, 1, 1, 4, 1, 2], [2, 1, 2, 3, 3], [10], [5, 5, 3]]
[12, 11, 10, 13]

Before spread with average of 14:
[[4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1], [10, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 3, 3], [6]]
Result and sum of each bucket:
[[3, 3, 3, 2, 3], [6, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1], [4, 3, 3, 2, 2], [10, 5]]
[14, 13, 14, 15]

Before spread with average of 4:
[[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1]]
Result and sum of each bucket:
[[1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]]
[4, 4, 4, 4, 4]

Before spread with average of 14:
[[10, 9, 8, 7], [6, 5, 4], [3, 2], [1]]
Result and sum of each bucket:
[[1, 7, 9], [10], [6, 5, 4], [3, 2, 8]]
[17, 10, 15, 13]
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This isn't bin packing as others have suggested. There the size of bins is fixed and you are trying to minimize the number. Here you are trying to minimize the variance among a fixed number of bins.

It turns out this is equivalent to Multiprocessor Scheduling, and - according to the reference - the algorithm below (known as "Longest Job First" or "Longest Processing Time First") is certain to produce a largest sum no more than 4/3 - 1/(3m) times optimal, where m is the number of buckets. In the test cases shonw, we'd have 4/3-1/12 = 5/4 or no more than 25% above optimal.

We just start with all bins empty, and put each item in decreasing order of size into the currently least full bin. We can track the least full bin efficiently with a min heap. With a heap having O(log n) insert and deletemin, the algorithm has O(n log m) time (n and m defined as @Jonas Elfström says). Ruby is very expressive here: only 9 sloc for the algorithm itself.

Here is code. I am not a Ruby expert, so please feel free to suggest better ways. I am using @Jonas Elfström's test cases.

require 'algorithms'
require 'pp'

test_buckets = [ 
  [ [10, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1], [5, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 1, 1], [2] ],
  [ [4, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1], [10, 5, 3, 2, 1], [3, 3, 3], [6] ],
  [ [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1], [1, 1] ],
  [ [10, 9, 8, 7], [6, 5, 4], [3, 2], [1] ],
]

def relevel(buckets)
  q = Containers::PriorityQueue.new { |x, y| x < y }

  # Initially all buckets to be returned are empty and so have zero sums.
  rtn = Array.new(buckets.length) { [] } 
  buckets.each_index {|i| q.push(i, 0) }
  sums = Array.new(buckets.length, 0)

  # Add to emptiest bucket in descending order. 
  # Bang! ops would generate less garbage.
  buckets.flatten.sort.reverse.each do |val|
    i = q.pop                 # Get index of emptiest bucket
    rtn[i] << val             # Append current value to it
    q.push(i, sums[i] += val) # Update sums and min heap
  end
  rtn
end

test_buckets.each {|b| pp relevel(b).map {|a| a.inject(:+) }}

Results:

[12, 11, 11, 12]
[14, 14, 14, 14]
[4, 4, 4, 4, 4]
[13, 13, 15, 14]
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A very even spread indeed but you are starting with empty buckets and that's not my scenario. –  Jonas Elfström May 24 '13 at 5:35
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Adapt the Knapsack Problem solving algorithms' by, for example, specify the "weight" of every buckets to be roughly equals to the mean of the n objects' sizes (try a gaussian distri around the mean value).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knapsack_problem#Solving

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My knapsacks are already packed. This might work but in the worst case scenario I could end up moving every object to another knapsack. That would be very inefficient. –  Jonas Elfström May 16 '13 at 13:40
    
Why can't you use the greedy algorithm (by Dantzig) ? It is not optimal (which is not a bad thing considering your problem) and it is worst-case O(n log n) dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2308382 –  georgesl May 16 '13 at 13:52
    
I can see how that would work for emptying a bucket down to the wanted size but it's not clear to me how I should distribute the objects to the other buckets. –  Jonas Elfström May 17 '13 at 7:48
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Sort buckets in size order.

Move an object from the largest bucket into the smallest bucket, re-sorting the array (which is almost-sorted, so we can use "limited insertion sort" in both directions; you can also speed things up by noting where you placed the last two buckets to be sorted. If you have 6-6-6-6-6-6-5... and get one object from the first bucket, you will move it to the sixth position. Then on the next iteration you can start comparing from the fifth. The same goes, right-to-left, for the smallest buckets).

When the difference of the two buckets is one, you can stop.

This moves the minimum number of buckets, but is of order n^2 log n for comparisons (the simplest version is n^3 log n). If object moving is expensive while bucket size checking is not, for reasonable n it might still do:

12 7 5 2
11 7 5 3
10 7 5 4
 9 7 5 5
 8 7 6 5
 7 7 6 6

12 7 3 1
11 7 3 2
10 7 3 3
 9 7 4 3
 8 7 4 4
 7 7 5 4
 7 6 5 5
 6 6 6 5

Another possibility would be to calculate the expected average size for every bucket, and "move along" a bag (or a further bucket) with the excess from the larger buckets to the smaller ones.

Otherwise, strange things may happen:

12 7 3 1, the average is a bit less than 6, so we take 5 as the average.

5 7 3 1  bag = 7 from 1st bucket
5 5 3 1  bag = 9
5 5 5 1  bag = 7
5 5 5 8  which is a bit unbalanced.

By taking 6 (i.e. rounding) it goes better, but again sometimes it won't work:

12 5 3 1
 6 5 3 1  bag = 6 from 1st bucket
 6 6 3 1  bag = 5
 6 6 6 1  bag = 2
 6 6 6 3  which again is unbalanced.

You can run two passes, the first with the rounded mean left-to-right, the other with the truncated mean right-to-left:

12 5 3 1  we want to get no more than 6 in each bucket
6 11 3 1
6  6 8 1
 6 6 6 3
 6 6 6 3  and now we want to get at least 5 in each bucket
 6 6 4 5  (we have taken 2 from bucket #3 into bucket #5)
 6 5 5 5  (when the difference is 1 we stop).

This will require "n log n" size checks, and no more than 2n object moves.

Another possibility which is interesting is to reason thus: you have m objects into n buckets. So you need to do an integer mapping of m onto n, and this is Bresenham's linearization algorithm. Run a (n,m) Bresenham on the sorted array, and at step i (i.e. against bucket i-th) the algorithm will tell you whether to use round(m/n) or floor(m/n) size. Then move objects from or to the "moving bag" according to bucket i-th size.

This requires n log n comparisons.

You can further reduce the number of object moves by initially removing all buckets that are either round(m/n) or floor(m/n) in size to two pools of buckets sized R or F. When, running the algorithm, you need the i-th bucket to hold R objects, if the pool of R objects is not empty, swap the i-th bucket with one of the R-sized ones. This way, only buckets that are hopelessly under- or over-sized get balanced; (most of) the others are simply ignored, except for their references being shuffled.

If object access time is huge in proportion to computation time (e.g. some kind of automatic loader magazine), this will yield a magazine that is as balanced as possible, with the absolute minimum of overall object moves.

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You could use my answer to fitting n variable height images into 3 (similar length) column layout.

Mentally map:

  • Object size to picture height, and
  • bucket count to bincount

Then the rest of that solution should apply...


The following uses the first_fit algorithm mentioned by Robin Green earlier but then improves on this by greedy swapping.

The swapping routine finds the column that is furthest away from the average column height then systematically looks for a swap between one of its pictures and the first picture in another column that minimizes the maximum deviation from the average.

I used a random sample of 30 pictures with heights in the range five to 50 'units'. The convergenge was swift in my case and improved significantly on the first_fit algorithm.

The code (Python 3.2:

def first_fit(items, bincount=3):
    items = sorted(items, reverse=1) # New - improves first fit.
    bins     = [[] for c in range(bincount)]
    binsizes = [0] * bincount
    for item in items:
        minbinindex = binsizes.index(min(binsizes))
        bins[minbinindex].append(item)
        binsizes[minbinindex] += item
    average = sum(binsizes) / float(bincount)
    maxdeviation = max(abs(average - bs) for bs in binsizes)

    return bins, binsizes, average, maxdeviation

def swap1(columns, colsize, average, margin=0):
    'See if you can do a swap to smooth the heights'
    colcount = len(columns)
    maxdeviation, i_a = max((abs(average - cs), i)
                              for i,cs in enumerate(colsize))
    col_a = columns[i_a]
    for pic_a in set(col_a): # use set as if same height then only do once
        for i_b, col_b in enumerate(columns):
            if i_a != i_b: # Not same column
                for pic_b in set(col_b):
                    if (abs(pic_a - pic_b) > margin): # Not same heights
                        # new heights if swapped
                        new_a = colsize[i_a] - pic_a + pic_b
                        new_b = colsize[i_b] - pic_b + pic_a
                        if all(abs(average - new) < maxdeviation
                               for new in (new_a, new_b)):
                            # Better to swap (in-place)
                            colsize[i_a] = new_a
                            colsize[i_b] = new_b
                            columns[i_a].remove(pic_a)
                            columns[i_a].append(pic_b)
                            columns[i_b].remove(pic_b)
                            columns[i_b].append(pic_a)
                            maxdeviation = max(abs(average - cs)
                                               for cs in colsize)
                            return True, maxdeviation
    return False, maxdeviation

def printit(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation):
    print('columns')
    pp(columns)
    print('colsize:', colsize)
    print('average, maxdeviation:', average, maxdeviation)
    print('deviations:', [abs(average - cs) for cs in colsize])
    print()


if __name__ == '__main__':
    ## Some data
    #import random
    #heights = [random.randint(5, 50) for i in range(30)]
    ## Here's some from the above, but 'fixed'.
    from pprint import pprint as pp

    heights = [45, 7, 46, 34, 12, 12, 34, 19, 17, 41,
               28, 9, 37, 32, 30, 44, 17, 16, 44, 7,
               23, 30, 36, 5, 40, 20, 28, 42, 8, 38]

    columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation = first_fit(heights)
    printit(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation)
    while 1:
        swapped, maxdeviation = swap1(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation)
        printit(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation)
        if not swapped:
            break
        #input('Paused: ')

The output:

columns
[[45, 12, 17, 28, 32, 17, 44, 5, 40, 8, 38],
 [7, 34, 12, 19, 41, 30, 16, 7, 23, 36, 42],
 [46, 34, 9, 37, 44, 30, 20, 28]]
colsize: [286, 267, 248]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 19.0
deviations: [19.0, 0.0, 19.0]

columns
[[45, 12, 17, 28, 17, 44, 5, 40, 8, 38, 9],
 [7, 34, 12, 19, 41, 30, 16, 7, 23, 36, 42],
 [46, 34, 37, 44, 30, 20, 28, 32]]
colsize: [263, 267, 271]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 4.0
deviations: [4.0, 0.0, 4.0]

columns
[[45, 12, 17, 17, 44, 5, 40, 8, 38, 9, 34],
 [7, 34, 12, 19, 41, 30, 16, 7, 23, 36, 42],
 [46, 37, 44, 30, 20, 28, 32, 28]]
colsize: [269, 267, 265]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 2.0
deviations: [2.0, 0.0, 2.0]

columns
[[45, 12, 17, 17, 44, 5, 8, 38, 9, 34, 37],
 [7, 34, 12, 19, 41, 30, 16, 7, 23, 36, 42],
 [46, 44, 30, 20, 28, 32, 28, 40]]
colsize: [266, 267, 268]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 1.0
deviations: [1.0, 0.0, 1.0]

columns
[[45, 12, 17, 17, 44, 5, 8, 38, 9, 34, 37],
 [7, 34, 12, 19, 41, 30, 16, 7, 23, 36, 42],
 [46, 44, 30, 20, 28, 32, 28, 40]]
colsize: [266, 267, 268]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 1.0
deviations: [1.0, 0.0, 1.0]

Nice problem.


Heres the info on reverse-sorting mentioned in my separate comment below.

>>> h = sorted(heights, reverse=1)
>>> h
[46, 45, 44, 44, 42, 41, 40, 38, 37, 36, 34, 34, 32, 30, 30, 28, 28, 23, 20, 19, 17, 17, 16, 12, 12, 9, 8, 7, 7, 5]
>>> columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation = first_fit(h)
>>> printit(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation)
columns
[[46, 41, 40, 34, 30, 28, 19, 12, 12, 5],
 [45, 42, 38, 36, 30, 28, 17, 16, 8, 7],
 [44, 44, 37, 34, 32, 23, 20, 17, 9, 7]]
colsize: [267, 267, 267]
average, maxdeviation: 267.0 0.0
deviations: [0.0, 0.0, 0.0]

If you have the reverse-sorting, this extra code appended to the bottom of the above code (in the 'if name == ...), will do extra trials on random data:

for trial in range(2,11):
    print('\n## Trial %i' % trial)
    heights = [random.randint(5, 50) for i in range(random.randint(5, 50))]
    print('Pictures:',len(heights))
    columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation = first_fit(heights)
    print('average %7.3f' % average, '\nmaxdeviation:')
    print('%5.2f%% = %6.3f' % ((maxdeviation * 100. / average), maxdeviation))
    swapcount = 0
    while maxdeviation:
        swapped, maxdeviation = swap1(columns, colsize, average, maxdeviation)
        if not swapped:
            break
        print('%5.2f%% = %6.3f' % ((maxdeviation * 100. / average), maxdeviation))
        swapcount += 1
    print('swaps:', swapcount)

The extra output shows the effect of the swaps:

## Trial 2
Pictures: 11
average  72.000 
maxdeviation:
 9.72% =  7.000
swaps: 0

## Trial 3
Pictures: 14
average 118.667 
maxdeviation:
 6.46% =  7.667
 4.78% =  5.667
 3.09% =  3.667
 0.56% =  0.667
swaps: 3

## Trial 4
Pictures: 46
average 470.333 
maxdeviation:
 0.57% =  2.667
 0.35% =  1.667
 0.14% =  0.667
swaps: 2

## Trial 5
Pictures: 40
average 388.667 
maxdeviation:
 0.43% =  1.667
 0.17% =  0.667
swaps: 1

## Trial 6
Pictures: 5
average  44.000 
maxdeviation:
 4.55% =  2.000
swaps: 0

## Trial 7
Pictures: 30
average 295.000 
maxdeviation:
 0.34% =  1.000
swaps: 0

## Trial 8
Pictures: 43
average 413.000 
maxdeviation:
 0.97% =  4.000
 0.73% =  3.000
 0.48% =  2.000
swaps: 2

## Trial 9
Pictures: 33
average 342.000 
maxdeviation:
 0.29% =  1.000
swaps: 0

## Trial 10
Pictures: 26
average 233.333 
maxdeviation:
 2.29% =  5.333
 1.86% =  4.333
 1.43% =  3.333
 1.00% =  2.333
 0.57% =  1.333
swaps: 4
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You could use an Integer Programming Package if it's fast enough.

It may be tricky getting your constraints right. Something like the following may do the trick:

let variable Oij denote Object i being in Bucket j. Let Wi represent the weight or size of Oi

Constraints:

sum(Oij for all j) == 1       #each object is in only one bucket
Oij = 1 or 0.                 #object is either in bucket j or not in bucket j
sum(Oij * Wi for all i) <= X + R   #restrict weight on buckets.

Objective:

minimize X

Note R is the relaxation constant that you can play with depending on how much movement is required and how much performance is needed.

Now the maximum bucket size is X + R

The next step is to figure out the minimum amount movement possible whilst keeping the bucket size less than X + R

Define a Stay variable Si that controls if Oi stays in bucket j

If Si is 0 it indicates that Oi stays where it was.

Constraints:

Si = 1 or 0.
Oij = 1 or 0.
Oij <= Si where j != original bucket of Object i
Oij != Si where j == original bucket of Object i
Sum(Oij for all j) == 1
Sum(Oij for all i) <= X + R

Objective:

minimize Sum(Si for all i)

Here Sum(Si for all i) represents the number of objects that have moved.

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