Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not very good with powershell so here goes.

I'm having trouble with displaying the last logoff Date and time of a computer. So far I have:

$Logoff = GWMI -Comp $strComputer -Cl Win32_NetworkLoginProfile | 
    foreach-object {Write-Host "Last Logoff: "$_.Lastlogoff}

This gives me a list of I guess logoff dates and time. This seemed ok so I tried to convert the output using ConvertToDateTime to get a readable date/time but I don't now how to get it to work when a selection of datetimes are sent back. I've tried:

$Logoff = GWMI -Comp $strComputer -Cl Win32_NetworkLoginProfile | 
    foreach-object {Write-Host "Last Logoff: "ConvertToDateTime($_)}

but as you can guess this didn't work. Can someone point me in the right direction? Maybe I'm going about this wrong and I should be looking at a different way of getting last logoff/logoff details

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Another way of achieving the same result as Ansgar's suggested command:

Get-EventLog -ComputerName $Computer -LogName 'Security' -InstanceId 4634 -newest 1 | Select-object TimeGenerated

On my computer, there was a big difference in time taken to retrieve the result.

share|improve this answer
    
Filtering in get-wmiobject should be much faster than piping to where-object in almost every case. The former does the filtering at the source; the latter retrieves everything, then sifts through it all to find the data you want. Filter as far to the left as you can, always. –  alroc May 16 '13 at 15:58
    
Hi, The problem, with this is that there are loads of 4634 events for today, even though the computer has only been logged in/out once, the other events seem to be for other network locations etc and these seem to occur lots of times through the day. –  Dave May 16 '13 at 15:58
    
+1 for elegance. –  Ansgar Wiechers May 16 '13 at 16:12

You could read the most recent logoff event from the computers' eventlogs:

Get-EventLog -Computer $strComputer "Security" `
  | ? { $_.EventId -eq 4634 } `
  | sort -Desc TimeGenerated `
  | select -First 1 TimeGenerated

Note that reading the Security eventlog requires admin privileges. Also, reading the entire eventlog may require significant amounts of time, so you may want to restrict the processed events by date (-After (Get-Date).AddDays(-1)) or by number (-Newest 500).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, The problem, with this is that there are loads of 4634 events for today, even though the computer has only been logged in/out once, the other events seem to be for other network locations etc and these seem to occur lots of times through the day. –  Dave May 16 '13 at 15:58
    
Then you need to be more specific about the logoff events you want to select. How do they differ from the other logoff events? –  Ansgar Wiechers May 16 '13 at 16:13
    
@Dave - what kind of logoff event are you looking for? Are you looking for: 4647 - User initiated logoff? –  dugas May 16 '13 at 17:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.