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My implementation for Quicksort using Dutch National Flag partition technique. http://ideone.com/WgAiGG

And for a normal Quicksort.
http://ideone.com/GOE5Jl

The code for Quicksort using Dutch National Flag partition technique

#include<iostream>
#include<time.h>
using namespace std;

void partition (int *a, int s, int e, int &start, int &end)
{
     start=s-1; 
     int mid=s;
     end=e;

     int pivot=a[e],temp,i;

     while (mid < end)
     {
           if  (a[mid] < pivot)
           {
               temp = a[start+1];
               a[start+1] = a[mid];
               a[mid] = temp;
               start++;
               mid++;     
           }
           else if (a[mid] == pivot)
           {
                mid++;
           }
           else
           {
               temp = a[end-1];
               a[end-1] = a[mid];
               a[mid] = temp;
               end--;
           }
     }
     temp = a[mid];
     a[mid] = a[e];
     a[e] = temp;
     cout<<start<<" "<<end<<"\n";
}

void Qsort(int *a, int s, int e)
{
     if (s>=e)
        return;
     int start,end;
     partition(a,s,e,start,end);
     Qsort(a,s,start);
     Qsort(a,end+1,e);
}

int main()
{
    int a[100];
    int i,j;
    int n = sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
    srand(time(NULL));
    for (j=0;j<n;j++)
    {
        a[j] = rand()%40;
        cout<<a[j]<<" ";
    }
    clock_t start = clock();
    Qsort(a,0,n-1);

    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        cout<<a[i]<<"  ";
    }
    cout<<"\nTime elapsed: "<<((double)clock() - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<endl;

}

The code for normal Quicksort

#include<iostream>

#include<time.h>
using namespace std;

int partition (int *a, int s, int e)
{
    int i=s;
    int j=e-1;
    int pivot = a[e],temp;
    while (i<=j)
    {
          if  (a[i] < pivot)
          {
              i++;
              continue;
          }
          if  (a[j] > pivot)
          {
              j--;
              continue;
          }

          temp = a[i];
          a[i] = a[j];
          a[j] = temp;
          i++;
          j--;
    }

    temp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[e];
    a[e] = temp;
    return i;
}


void qsort (int *a, int s, int e)
{
     if  (s>=e)
     {
         return;
     }
     int i = partition (a,s,e);
     qsort(a,s,i-1);
     qsort(a,i,e);
}


int main()
{
    int a[100];
    int i,j;
    int n = sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
    srand(time(NULL));
    for (j=0;j<n;j++)
    {
        a[j] = rand()%40;
        cout<<a[j]<<" ";
    }
    clock_t start = clock();
    qsort(a,0,n-1);


    for (i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        cout<<a[i]<<"  ";
    }
    cout<<"\nTime elapsed: "<<((double)clock() - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<endl;

}
share|improve this question
    
These two implementations seem have similar time complexity, you may need to compare the running time for larger arrays, 100 elements is way too small to say something about it. –  taocp May 16 '13 at 13:57
    
I tried doing it for an array of 1000 elements where the rand() function was generating values in between 0-39, and still the former was slower than latter. –  user1560644 May 16 '13 at 14:00
    
Are you sure both arrays process exactly the same sequence of numbers? –  taocp May 16 '13 at 14:01
    
They do not. But I have tried number of times and never have I found Dutch partitioning Quicksort faster than the normal Quicksort. –  user1560644 May 16 '13 at 14:06
    
You have to feed both approaches with exactly same input array, then you can say that one is faster than the other. Since there are swap operations involved. Otherwise, the comparison is unfair. –  taocp May 16 '13 at 14:08

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