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I am using the following code:

eps = MkInfinitesimal()
print(( (1 + eps)**2- 1**2)/eps < 2.00000000001)
print(( (1 + eps)**2- 1**2)/eps > 2)

and the output is:

True
True

Other example: Proving that diff(x^2, x) = 2*pi when x = pi and diff(x^2,x) = 2*e when x = e

Code:

eps1 = MkInfinitesimal()
eps2 = MkInfinitesimal() # eps2 is infinitely smaller thant eps1
pi = Pi()
e = E()
print(( (pi + eps2)**2- pi**2)/eps2 < 2*pi + eps1)
print(( (pi + eps2)**2- pi**2)/eps2 > 2*pi)
print(( (e + eps2)**2- e**2)/eps2 < 2*e + eps1)
print(( (e + eps2)**2- e**2)/eps2 > 2*e)

Output:

True
True
True
True

Other example: Proving that diff(x^3, x) = 3*x^2 when x = e or x = pi.

Code:

eps1 = MkInfinitesimal()
eps2 = MkInfinitesimal() # eps2 is infinitely smaller thant eps1
pi = Pi()
e = E()
print(( (pi + eps2)**3- pi**3)/eps2 < 3*pi**2 + eps1)
print(( (pi + eps2)**3- pi**3)/eps2 > 3*pi**2)
print(( (e + eps2)**3- e**3)/eps2 < 3*e**2 + eps1)
print(( (e + eps2)**3- e**3)/eps2 > 3*e**2)

Output:

True
True
True
True

Other example:

Code:

[x] = MkRoots([-1, -1, 0, 0, 0, 1])
[y] = MkRoots([-197, 3131, -31*x**2, 0, 0, 0, 0, x])
[z] = MkRoots([-735*x*y, 7*y**2, -1231*x**3, 0, 0, y])
print(x.decimal(10))
print(y.decimal(10))
print(z.decimal(10))
eps1 = MkInfinitesimal()
eps2 = MkInfinitesimal() # eps2 is infinitely smaller thant eps1
print(( (x + eps2)**2- x**2)/eps2 < 2*x + eps1)
print(( (x + eps2)**2- x**2)/eps2 > 2*x)
print(( (y + eps2)**2- y**2)/eps2 < 2*y + eps1)
print(( (y + eps2)**2- y**2)/eps2 > 2*y)
print(( (z + eps2)**2- z**2)/eps2 < 2*z + eps1)
print(( (z + eps2)**2- z**2)/eps2 > 2*z)

Output:

1.1673039782?
0.0629726948?
31.4453571397?
True
True
True
True
True
True

This proof is correct? Please let me know if you know a better proof. Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
This is correct. You are checking: ((1 + esp)**2 - 1)/eps = (2*eps + eps**2)/eps = 2 + eps which is different from 2 for any eps != 0, so if eps > 0, the second result holds. Since eps is an infinitesimal it is less than any finite precision numeral above 2. –  Nikolaj Bjorner May 16 '13 at 16:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a nice example. The Z3RCF APIs will be available in the next official release of Z3Py.

BTW, you can create many infinitesimals in Z3RCF. Each one is infinitely smaller than the previously created ones. Here is the same example, but it avoids the 2.0000000001 by using two different infinitesimals (it is also available here).

eps1 = MkInfinitesimal()
eps2 = MkInfinitesimal() # eps2 is infinitely smaller thant eps1
print(( (1 + eps2)**2- 1**2)/eps2 < 2 + eps1)
print(( (1 + eps2)**2- 1**2)/eps2 > 2)
share|improve this answer

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