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I am trying to exit from a using statement while staying in an enclosing for loop. eg.

 for (int i = _from; i <= _to; i++)
 {

    try
    {

        using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
        {
            if (condition is true)
            {
                // I want to quit the using clause and
                // go to line marked //x below
                // using break or return drop me to line //y
                // outside of the for loop.
            }

        }

    } //x
}
//y

I have tried using break which spits me out at //y, however I want to remain in the for loop at //x so the for loop continues to process. I know that I can do it by throwing an exception and using a catch but I'd rather not do this relatively expensive operation if there is a more elegant way to break out of the using. Thanks!

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4  
Why not continue ? –  Ofiris May 16 '13 at 14:22
1  
You could perhaps put the using loop in a separate method, and return if the condition is true. –  Rogue May 16 '13 at 14:22
    
right Servy. Didn't think it through. Deleted. –  Serv May 16 '13 at 14:27
    
You could always wrap the rest of the code in the using statement with if (condition is false) –  Murkaeus May 16 '13 at 14:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As @Renan said you can use ! operator and invert your bool result on the condition. You also can use the continue C# keyworkd to go to next item of your loop.

for (int i = _from; i <= _to; i++)
{
    try
    {
        using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
        {
            if (condition is true)
            {
                // some code
 
                continue; // go to next i
            }
        }
    }
}
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I think the best answer is a mix of this, mine, and Dave Bish's. We could give an even better asnwer if the OP could provide a little more insight. Are there other things you would do inside the using block, regardless of the condition? –  Renan May 16 '13 at 14:25
    
continue wins it for me, thanks @Renan and Oriani –  Tim Newton May 16 '13 at 14:32

Skip the using completely:

if (condition is false)
{
    using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
....
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What if the condition is part of a database / EF etc call? –  Paul Zahra May 16 '13 at 14:32
1  
Then just put it inside? We can only recommend the best solution, based upon what's in the question... –  Dave Bish May 16 '13 at 14:33

Just change the if so that you enter the block if the condition is NOT true. Then have the rest of the code inside that block.

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There is no need to break out of a using block because a using block does not loop. You can simply fall through to the end. If there is code you don't want to execute, skip it using an if-clause.

    using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
        if (condition)
        {
            // all your code that is executed only on condition
        }
    }
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I would reverse the logic and say:

for (int i = _from; i <= _to; i++)
{

    try
    {

        using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
        {
            if (condition is false)
            {
                // in here is the stuff you wanted to run in your using
            }
            //having nothing out here means you'll be out of the using immediately if the condition is true
        }

    } //x
}
//y

On the other hand if you skip the using completely as Dave Bish suggests, your code will perform better because in the cases where you didn't want the using you won't create an object simply to do nothing with it...

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I wonder why u want to create transaction scopes within a for loop ? Is it necessary? Could cause possible escalations to DTC? Why not like this?

    using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
    {
        for (int i = _from; i <= _to; i++)
        {
            if (condition)
            {
                // Do the do
                continue;
            }
        }
    }
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Have you tried using

continue;

?

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This is probably better suited as a comment in it's current state. Just provide an example of using continue, instead of posing another question. –  Steven V May 16 '13 at 14:49

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