Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Maybe this question should be divided into two, but the first one is quite simple, it's about .equals(). I thought that == checks if two references point to the same object, while .equals() checks if their parameters' values are the same, as explained here: http://www.coderanch.com/t/409507/java/java/Difference-equals

But then I tried running this:

public class EqualsTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Integer i1 = new Integer(1);
        Integer i2 = new Integer(1);
        System.out.println(i1.equals(i2));

        Nested n1 = new Nested();
        Nested n2 = new Nested();
        n1.i = i1;
        n2.i = i2;
        System.out.println(n1.equals(n2));
    }
}

class Nested {
    Integer i;
}

And I get as output:

true
false

As expected when reading Javadoc http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#equals(java.lang.Object)

So, from my understanding, to make .equals() differ from ==, we need to override it. Right?

My second question is, is there any way of making objects from a class <A> to be unique (automatically overriden when calling add()) in a Set<A> without overriding the method .equals() in <A>?

share|improve this question
3  
Please be careful to override hashCode in addition to equals. –  Marko Topolnik May 16 '13 at 15:00
    
Thanks, but I can't override equals, the class doesn't belong to me. I'll have to do it some other way. –  Luis Sep May 16 '13 at 15:12
1  
One hack I can suggest is using a TreeMap with a custom Comparator. Of course, if you don't have an ordering for the items, this in not an option. In that case you can make your wrapper object which will implement equals. –  Marko Topolnik May 16 '13 at 15:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

to make .equals() differ from ==, we need to override it. Right?

Yes that's right.

is there any way of making objects from a class to be unique (automatically overriden when calling add()) in a Set without overriding the method .equals() in ?

If you don't override equals, then each new instance will appear unique from the set's perspective.

share|improve this answer

To ensure your objects act correctly in all cases you should implement equals, hashCode and make it implement Comparable by implementing a compareTo.

Remember that HashSet uses equals and hashCode but TreeSet uses compareTo.

share|improve this answer

While overriding .equals() is part of the process, you also have to overwrite hashCode().

In a set, especially HashSet, the .hashCode() method is called to get the hashcode, and then, only if two object have the same hashCode are they then checked for .equals().

You should read the documentaion on the equals/hashcode contract here:

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.