Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using reflection to add an event handler to an event :

var eventInfo = type.GetEvent(eventName);
MethodInfo mi = GetType().GetMethod("TestMethod", 
           BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
var delegateForMethod = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, this, mi);
eventInfo.AddEventHandler(this, delegateForMethod);

This successfully calls my test method when the event occurs which is great, but now I need to know the name of the event that ended up calling this method...

void TestMethod(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // I know the sender, but which event was fired on the sender?
}

The reason I need this is because I have this generic register method which hooks up handlers to different types, and different events and channels them all to one method, while also making a note of what was attached. Once the test method fires, I need to pull out that note and use the info to notify the correct object that their "desired" event has fired. -- but to know this I need to know the event name as well as the type.

For example, in register I added Event A in type X for object O.... now when I see it triggered in the test method, I need to know it was Event A in type X, so I can notify object O by a certain interface method on it.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to know, and what's the bigger picture here? –  Jon Skeet May 16 '13 at 15:00
    
You probably shouldn't have to know it in the first place, but for the sake of it, look into the StackTrace class, see if you could find anything there. –  Yorye Nathan May 16 '13 at 15:01
1  
@YoryeNathan Note that may not be an option, depending on the context. A lot of events will fire the event handlers in another thread, which means a cleared stack trace. –  Servy May 16 '13 at 15:04
    
If I were you, I would be listening to the different events with different methods, each calling to a generic method to handle the case if necessary, or simply have extra information in the arguments (inherit from EventArgs). –  Yorye Nathan May 16 '13 at 15:22
    
@YoryeNathan unfortunately I cannot mess with the source of the events, or change the arguments because they are in a different project and I want that project to be totally ignorant of what I am doing here. –  Muhammad May 16 '13 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

Crazy thinking here.

To every event you are going to add TestMethod, before TestMethod you add an anonimous method, wich I will call SetEventName for understanding purposes.

That SetEventName just sets some GlobalEventName variable in your class taking eventName. (I suppose there's a way to use a lambda expression for that).

So, every time the event is fired. SetEventName is called. Your GlobalEventName is set. Then TestMethod is called. And inside TestMethod, use the GlobalEventName to do your job.


See an idea (sorry, I don't understand reflection quite well to put a ready-to-use code, but that's the idea)

var eventInfo = type.GetEvent(eventName);

Action<object, EventArgs> SetEventName = (Ob, Args) => GlobalEventName = eventName;
//I really don't know if it would work but....

Add that to the eventInfo before adding the TestMethod.

MethodInfo mi = GetType().GetMethod("TestMethod", 
       BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
var delegateForMethod = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, this, mi);
eventInfo.AddEventHandler(this, delegateForMethod);

And your testmethod:

void TestMethod(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //Use the GlobalEventName to get event's name.
    // I know the sender, but which event was fired on the sender?
}
share|improve this answer

There is no problem that canot be solved by introducing an additional level of abstraction!

Bind event like this:

obj.SomeEvent += (sender, args) => TestMethod("SomeEvent", sender, args);

or by reflection:

var eventInfo = type.GetEvent(eventName);
EventHandler delegateForMethod = (o, args) => TestMethod(eventInfo.Name, o, args);
eventInfo.AddEventHandler(this, delegateForMethod);

And in handler you can access event name from parameter:

void TestMethod(string eventName, object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // eventName is event was fired on the sender
    TestMethod(sender, e);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.