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I have a table of events, each row has a StartDateTime column. I need to query a subset of events(say by userID) and determine the average number of days between successive events.

The table basically, looks like this.

TransactionID   TransactionStartDateTime
----------------------------------------
277             2011-11-19 11:00:00.000
278             2011-11-19 11:00:00.000
279             2012-03-20 15:19:46.160
288             2012-03-20 19:23:06.507
289             2012-03-20 19:43:41.980
291             2012-03-20 19:55:17.523

I have attempted to adapt the following query referenced in this Question:

select a.TransactionID, b.TransactionID, avg(b.TransactionStartDateTime-a.TransactionStartDateTime) from
     (select *, row_number() over (order by TransactionStartDateTime) rn from Transactions) a
join (select *, row_number() over (order by TransactionStartDateTime) rn from Transactions) b on (a.rn=b.rn-1)
group by
a.TransactionID, b.TransactionID

But I am not having any luck here as the original query was not expecting DateTimes

My expected result is a single digit representing average days(which I now realize is not what the query above would give)

Any ideas?

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1  
sql server 2008 –  stephen776 May 16 '13 at 15:11
    
@stephen776 what is your expected result ?? –  Amit Singh May 16 '13 at 15:16
2  
I might now have understood the question correctly but if you have 4 times (T1, T2, T3 and T4). Your average would be [(T2 - T1) + (T3 -T2) + (T4 - T3)]/3. Which is (T4-T1)/3 which equals (Max Date - Min Date)/(Count -1) –  arunlalam May 16 '13 at 15:18
    
My expected result is just a single number representing the average –  stephen776 May 16 '13 at 15:28
1  
I think the solution from @roughnex makes sense. I was way over-thinking things(read under-thinking :/ ) –  stephen776 May 16 '13 at 15:35
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know which answer is the best for your case. But your question raises an issue I think database developers (and programmers in general) should be more aware of.

Taking an average is easy, but the average is often the wrong measure of central tendency.

transactionid  start_time               end_time                 elapsed_days
--
277            2011-11-19 11:00:00      2011-11-19 11:00:00      0
278            2011-11-19 11:00:00      2012-03-20 15:19:46.16   122
279            2012-03-20 15:19:46.16   2012-03-20 19:23:06.507  0
288            2012-03-20 19:23:06.507  2012-03-20 19:43:41.98   0
289            2012-03-20 19:43:41.98   2012-03-20 19:55:17.523  0
291            2012-03-20 19:55:17.523     

Here's what a histogram of that distribution looks like.

Histogram of elapsed days between successive events

The average of elapsed days is 24.4, but the median is 0. And the median is clearly the better measure of central tendency here. If you had to bet whether the next value would be closer to 0, closer to 24, or closer to 122, smart money would bet on 0.

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If your expected result is a single digit representing average days. Try this :

SELECT  AVG(DATEDIFF(DAY, a.TransactionStartDateTime,
                 b.TransactionStartDateTime))
FROM    ( SELECT    * ,
                ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY TransactionStartDateTime ) rn
      FROM      Transactions
    ) a
    JOIN ( SELECT   * ,
                    ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY TransactionStartDateTime ) rn
           FROM     Transactions
         ) b ON ( a.rn = b.rn - 1 )
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you need to change

avg(b.TransactionStartDateTime-a.TransactionStartDateTime) 

to

avg(datediff(DAY,  a.TransactionStartDateTime, b.TransactionStartDateTime))
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