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I'm trying to learn a little more about algorithms and have built a simple one to see, using brute force, whether a target number can be made from a grid of randomly created numbers. I've done enough to check whether five of the grid numbers added together will create the target, which should be enough for the purpose I had in mind, but the process is VERY slow, around 11 seconds on the iOS simulator. How can I speed things up here? Is there a more efficient way to do this than using all the loops I'm using? Here's all my code, GridNumber is a simple NSObject subclass that contains two integers, number and tag.

- (void)viewDidLoad
 {
      [super viewDidLoad];

      // 0. Set up target number.
      int random = arc4random() % 100 + 3;
      NSNumber *target = [NSNumber numberWithInt: random];

      // 1. Set up array of available numbers.
      NSMutableArray *grid = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
      for (int i = 1; i < 48; i++) {
           GridNumber *number = [[GridNumber alloc] initWithRandomIntegerAndTag: i];
           [grid addObject: number];
      }

      if ([self canTarget: target BeMadeFromGrid: grid]) NSLog(@"--- SOLVEABLE!");
      else NSLog(@"--- UNSOLVEABLE!");
 }

 - (BOOL) canTarget: (NSNumber *) target BeMadeFromGrid: (NSArray *) grid
 {
      NSLog(@"TARGET NUMBER IS: %d", target.intValue);

      // 2. See if the target already exists first.
      for (GridNumber *firstValue in grid) {
           if (firstValue.number == target.intValue) {
                NSLog(@"SOLVEABLE IN 1: Grid already contains target!");
                return YES;
           }
      }

      // 3. Add elements once, see if any of those give the result.
      for (GridNumber *firstValue in grid) {
           for (GridNumber *secondValue in grid) {
                int result = firstValue.number + secondValue.number;
                if (result == target.intValue && firstValue.tag != secondValue.tag) {
                     NSLog(@"SOLVEABLE IN 2: Adding %d and %d creates target!", firstValue.number, secondValue.number);
                     return YES;
                }
           }
      }

      // 4. Add elements twice, see if any of those give the result.
      for (GridNumber *firstValue in grid) {
           for (GridNumber *secondValue in grid) {
                for (GridNumber *thirdValue in grid) {
                     int result = firstValue.number + secondValue.number + thirdValue.number;
                     if (result == target.intValue && firstValue.tag != secondValue.tag && firstValue.tag != thirdValue.tag && secondValue.tag != thirdValue.tag) {
                          NSLog(@"SOLVEABLE IN 3: Adding %d, %d and %d creates target!", firstValue.number, secondValue.number, thirdValue.number);
                          return YES;
                     }
                }
           }
      }

      // 5. And three times..
      for (GridNumber *firstValue in grid) {
           for (GridNumber *secondValue in grid) {
                for (GridNumber *thirdValue in grid) {
                     for (GridNumber *fourthValue in grid) {
                          int result = firstValue.number + secondValue.number + thirdValue.number + fourthValue.number;
                          if (result == target.intValue && firstValue.tag != secondValue.tag && firstValue.tag != thirdValue.tag && firstValue.tag != fourthValue.tag &&
                              secondValue.tag != thirdValue.tag && secondValue.tag != fourthValue.tag && thirdValue.tag != fourthValue.tag) {
                               NSLog(@"SOLVEABLE IN 4: Adding %d, %d, %d and %d creates target!", firstValue.number, secondValue.number, thirdValue.number, fourthValue.number);
                               return YES;
                          }
                     }
                }
           }
      }

      // 6. And four times..
      for (GridNumber *firstValue in grid) {
           for (GridNumber *secondValue in grid) {
                for (GridNumber *thirdValue in grid) {
                     for (GridNumber *fourthValue in grid) {
                          for (GridNumber *fifthValue in grid) {
                               int result = firstValue.number + secondValue.number + thirdValue.number + fourthValue.number + fifthValue.number;
                               if (result == target.intValue && firstValue.tag != secondValue.tag && firstValue.tag != thirdValue.tag && firstValue.tag != fourthValue.tag &&
                                   firstValue.tag != fifthValue.tag && secondValue.tag != thirdValue.tag && secondValue.tag != fourthValue.tag && secondValue.tag != fifthValue.tag &&
                                   thirdValue.tag != fourthValue.tag && thirdValue.tag != fifthValue.tag && fourthValue.tag != fifthValue.tag) {
                                    NSLog(@"SOLVEABLE IN 5: Adding %d, %d, %d, %d and %d creates target!", firstValue.number, secondValue.number, thirdValue.number, fourthValue.number, fifthValue.number);
                                    return YES;
                               }
                          }
                     }
                }
           }
      }

      // 7. This is if it can't be made.
      return NO;
 }
share|improve this question
    
Paralelize the tasks into multiple threads. –  Shark May 16 '13 at 15:14
    
@Shark I was thinking more in terms of the efficiency of the algorithm itself. –  lukech May 16 '13 at 15:16
    
In that case simply rewrite it, as to put it bluntly - it's plain garbage. you're doing O(n), followed by O(n^2) then O(n^3) then O(n^4) only to end up with O(n^5) ... You would save time if you only tried the last variant, but it seems like you're trying to find a combination out of a set that can add up to a number, right? Why not explore the mathematical background of the problem first before tackling the code? If you did, you would find that this subset-sum problem is NP-hard is in no way something to attempt 'while learning algorithms'. –  Shark May 16 '13 at 15:18
    
@Shark I have no idea what O(n) means, I'm new to algorithm design and I'd like some specific pointers on thinking to rewrite the algorithm, not something conceptual that I don't understand. –  lukech May 16 '13 at 15:19
1  
@Shark: This "plain garbage" is also called "iterative deepening" and (in a more general form, where recursion is used to allow any number of elements to be added instead of limiting to 5) is a good strategy for searching large spaces. Stop being rude, and before you accuse someone else of doing something stupid, make sure it's actually stupid. –  j_random_hacker May 17 '13 at 8:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on the idea of @torquestomp, here is some C code I was able to put together quickly. For a grid of 48 numbers (in the range of 1 to 21) looking for a target less than 203 it hardly ever takes more than a few hundreths of a second to run. The runtime will increase as you allow for longer solutions (more than 5 or 6 numbers). Note that I have not fully tested this function. The times reported are on a Mac. On the iPhone they will be slower.

Edit: if you sort the list of numbers in descending order you should find the "optimal" (fewer numbers in sum) solutions first.

typedef void(^execution_block_t)(void);

double time_execution(execution_block_t aBlock);
double time_execution(execution_block_t aBlock)
{
    uint64_t time0 = mach_absolute_time();
    aBlock();
    uint64_t time1 = mach_absolute_time();
    return (double)(time1 - time0)/NSEC_PER_SEC;
}

static int totalTests = 0;

int findPartialSum(int target, int *grid, int gridCount, int startIndex, int *solution, int depth, int maxDepth)
{
    for (int i=startIndex;  i<gridCount;  i++) {

        int newTarget = target - grid[i];
        totalTests++;

        if (newTarget == 0) {
            solution[depth-1] = i;
            return 1;
        }

        if (newTarget > 0 && depth < maxDepth) {
            int found = findPartialSum(newTarget, grid, gridCount, i+1, solution, depth+1, maxDepth);
            if (found > 0) {
                solution[depth-1] = i;
                return found + 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}


int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    @autoreleasepool {

        static const int gridSize = 48;
        static const int solutionSize = 5;

        int *solution = calloc(sizeof(int), solutionSize);
        int *grid     = calloc(sizeof(int), gridSize);
        int  target   = arc4random_uniform(200) + 3;

        for (int i=0;  i<gridSize;  i++)
            grid[i] = arc4random_uniform(20) + 1;

        NSMutableArray *numbers = [NSMutableArray array];
        for (int i=0;  i<gridSize;  i++)
            [numbers addObject:@(grid[i])];

        NSLog(@"\nTarget = %d\nGrid = %@", target, [numbers componentsJoinedByString:@","]);

        __block int count = 0;
        double elapsedTime = time_execution(^(void) {
            count = findPartialSum(target, grid, gridSize, 0, solution, 1, solutionSize);
        });

        NSLog(@"Looking for solution with up to %d numbers", solutionSize);
        if (count > 0) {

            [numbers removeAllObjects];
            for (int i=0;  i<count;  i++)
                [numbers addObject:@(grid[solution[i]])];

            NSLog(@"Found solution with %d numbers: %@", count, [numbers componentsJoinedByString:@","]);

        } else {
            NSLog(@"No solution found");
        }

        NSLog(@"After looking at %d possible sums",totalTests);
        NSLog(@"Elapsed time was %fs", elapsedTime);

        free(solution);
        free(grid);
    }
    return 0;
}

Some sample outputs:

Target = 159
Grid = 16,18,19,6,18,5,12,7,7,4,18,3,7,13,10,19,7,14,19,6,16,4,8,4,3,17,11,16,5,8,18,9,4,13,14,8,17,18,13,5,20,14,4,5,13,20,17,1
Looking for solution with up to 5 numbers
No solution found
After looking at 1925356 possible sums
Elapsed time was 0.014727s


Target = 64
Grid = 4,6,1,1,13,12,15,10,11,6,18,6,8,2,15,3,18,5,20,1,3,12,20,3,18,5,1,12,15,14,2,20,9,1,14,9,6,1,2,10,12,7,7,4,2,12,20,6
Looking for solution with up to 5 numbers
Found solution with 5 numbers: 4,6,18,18,18
After looking at 7271 possible sums
Elapsed time was 0.000048s
share|improve this answer

This is known as the Subset-Sum Problem, and it is known to be NP-hard, so you are out of luck if you're looking for a really efficient solution. NP-hard means that there is no known polynomial-time (i.e., fast) solution with regards to the size of the input (the number of numbers in the grid). An understanding of big-Oh notation is rudimentary to taking advantage of this knowledge, so that seems like a good place to start.

However, since you are using only positive integers, and the target number is always in the range [3,102], a pseudo-polynomial-time solution is available through the use of Dynamic Programming. As @Shark has mentioned, this is probably the thing you really want to focus on for now - if you don't understand the basics of recursive problem solving, tackling a known NP-hard problem right off the bat isn't the best idea ;)

In pseudo-code, you want to do something like this:

Define array on [0,102] representing reachable numbers.  Set 0 to be reachable
for each NSNumber in grid:
    Looping upwards, for every reachable target in [3,102], set target + NSNumber to be reachable too
    If the sum exceeds 102, cut the loop
Return true if, after checking all numbers, target is reachable

This generalized algorithm runs in O(N*M) time for positive integers, where N is the number of numbers in the grid, and M is the maximum possible target. For N = 48 and M = 102, this should perform way better than the O(N^5) algorithm you are currently using

share|improve this answer
    
I'm struggling to understand a lot of what you've said here. The pseudocode doesn't make a lot of sense to me, and I'm not sure what dynamic programming is. My code should indicate that reusing numbers is NOT allowed, that's what all the &&s and tags are for, ensuring that the same number in the grid isn't used twice. –  lukech May 16 '13 at 15:22
    
thumbs up for mentioning NP-hardness :) –  Shark May 16 '13 at 15:22
    
My mistake, didn't scroll far enough to the right. –  torquestomp May 16 '13 at 15:25

You can also try generating a set containing all combinations of additions, and checking whether your target number is in that set (list). Generating such a set would take a long time, but that would give you the benefit of looking up more than one target against the same set in O(logn) - making it more efficient for running multiple queries against your grid.

Instead of re-adding the numbers and essentially re-generating the set every time you want to check a new target against the same grid of numbers.

share|improve this answer
    
the idea is not a bad one but can become prohibitively expensive to compute in terms of memory. For a 5 number solution there are about 200M possibilities. Even if cut this number by 4 by truncating branches you would still get 50M entries in the set. –  aLevelOfIndirection May 17 '13 at 7:20
1  
Although you attack the OP for writing "plain garbage" and being ignorant, you're apparently not aware that the OP's approach goes by the name "iterative deepening" and is not only a valid but also a smart strategy for tackling hard search problems (e.g. chess). The fact that e.g. every combo of 4 numbers is regenerated when trying every combo of 5 numbers doesn't matter in theory or practice, because the former loop (and all the loops preceding it) only takes O(1/n) as long as the final one anyway. It's only as "bad" as adding an extra O(1) step to an O(n) algorithm. –  j_random_hacker May 17 '13 at 8:19

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