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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void function(void *i, void *j);

struct mystruct {
    int a;
    int b;
} ;

int main()
{

    int a = 50;

    struct mystruct s ;
    s.a = 100;
    s.b = 200;
    function(&a, &s);


}


void function(void *i, void *j)
{
    printf("Integer is %d\n", *i);
    printf("Struct member 1 is %d\n", j->a);
    printf("Struct member 2 is %d\n", j->b);


}

My code above. On compilation I get the following errors and I understand what I need to do to fix them.

voidstartest.c: In function function:
voidstartest.c:27: warning: dereferencing  void *  pointer
voidstartest.c:27: error: invalid use of void expression
voidstartest.c:28: warning: dereferencing  void *  pointer
voidstartest.c:28: error: request for member  a  in something not a structure or union
voidstartest.c:29: warning: dereferencing  void *  pointer
voidstartest.c:29: error: request for member  b  in something not a structure or union

Here's what I need to do to fix the errors:

printf("Integer is %d\n", *(int*)i);

printf("Struct member 1 is %d\n", ((struct mystruct *)j)->a);

printf("Struct member 2 is %d\n", ((struct mystruct *)j)->b);

Questions:

  1. If I have to fix the errors the way I described above doesn't that mean that I have to know the type of pointers I am sending to the function in advance? I find this to be a very strict requirement. Isn't it?

  2. Some library functions have formal argument as void * also ( like qsort). How doer their implementation know what is the correct type of the pointer so that they can dereference it to work on actual data ( it points to)?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. Yes. Which means you can't write the function in a type agnostic way, and therefore need to rethink your design. When working with void* one usually writes a template function, and asks the user for function pointers to functions that are aware of the type and do basic operations .

  2. Their implementation doesn't. They also ask you for function pointers or size parameters in the same manner I described above.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I see that qsort.c casts the base to char* and then using the size of one array element and the number of elements does pointer arithmetic to reach out to other array elements for selecting which elements to compare for the algorithm implementation. forums.devshed.com/c-programming-42/… – abc May 17 '13 at 15:38

C is statically typed. A C program generally can not deduce at runtime the type of an object pointed to by a pointer, whether it is a void pointer or other kind of pointer. And it trusts you not to abuse pointers by pointing them to an object of a different type from their own declared type. Dynamically typed languages generally incur an overhead in providing such extra functionality.

qsort doesn't need to know the type of the object pointed to by its void pointer arguments. It knows their sizes, and is provided with a comparison function which is expected to have been written to compare objects of the type in question.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I see that qsort.c casts the base to char* and then using the size of one array element and the number of elements does pointer arithmetic to reach out to other array elements for selecting which elements to compare for the algorithm implementation. forums.devshed.com/c-programming-42/… – abc May 17 '13 at 15:38

A library function can handle a void* many different ways. For instance, qsort requires the user to supply a function pointer, which is written for specific types. This way, the user only needs to know the types, but qsort works without this information.

Other functions, like memcpy, accept void* for convenience. In reality, since memcpy is a byte-wise copy, it casts the parameters to char* so it can work on the byte level.

One could also write a function similar to printf which takes a string that identifies the types of its parameters. In a similar vein, the va_arg macro (which is used to work with varargs) expects a type parameter, e.g. va_arg(list, int). Although printf and va_arg don't work with void* (I think?), they face the same problem since a va_list is untyped. So these concepts can be used also for functions which operate on void*.

share|improve this answer

Some library functions have formal argument as void * also ( like qsort). How doer their implementation know what is the correct type of the pointer so that they can dereference it to work on actual data ( it points to)?

Because you also provide a comparison function, which takes two void pointers and returns the result of the comparison:

void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
           int(*compar)(const void *, const void *));

In that function you can cast the void pointers to pointers to the actual type of the array elements, and then perform any operation you want

int compare_your_structs(const void *first, const void *second)
{
    const struct mystruct *first_struct = (struct mystruct *)first;
    const struct mystruct *second_struct = (struct mystruct *)second;
    /* sort by the "a" field only */
    return first_struct->a - second_struct->a;
}
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