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I have a simple extension method for string class which will strip all non numeric characters from a string. So if I have a string like for example a phone number such as "(555) 215-4444" it will convert it to "5552154444". It looks like this:

public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
{
    Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");
    return digitsOnly.Replace(input, String.Empty);
}

I am just wondering what is the most elegant way to handle a null value here? Is there a typical pattern to follow in these cases, such as return back a null value if a null is passed in? It seems since I'm extending the string class here I may want to allow null values and not throw a arguement exception (since I'm not really passing in an arguement when I use this...) ? But some might argue I should throw an exception like a 'normal' method would. What's the best practice you are using here?

Thanks!

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1  
I'd treat the extension method like a normal one. It's just a way to tidy up how people read the code. Rather than StringFunctions.ToDigitsOnly(s) you shorten it to s.ToDigitsOnly(), so if you'd throw an exception in one, throw it in the other. –  Mikey Mouse May 16 '13 at 15:52
1  
If null is a valid/expected value in your application, return null. If not, throw an exception. Personally I would throw an ArgumentException here. –  Ginosaji May 16 '13 at 15:52
2  
As a side note; you don't need a Regex here String.Join("", input.Where(char.IsDigit)) –  I4V May 16 '13 at 15:55
1  
You could also do return new string(input.Where(char.IsDigit).ToArray()); –  Timothy Shields May 16 '13 at 16:50

4 Answers 4

You can follow the principle of least surprise: use pattern implemented in LINQ:

public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
{
    if(input == null)
          throw new ArgumentNullException("input");

    Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");
    return digitsOnly.Replace(input, String.Empty);
}

You can use method, proposed by Jon Skeet. It will reduce your check simply to

input.ThrowIfNull("input");

Also Jon has a good section 10.2.4 Calling a method on a null reference in C# in Depth, quote:

CHECKING FOR NULLITY As a conscientious developer, I’m sure that your production methods always check their arguments’ validity before proceeding. One question that naturally arises from this quirky feature of extension methods is what exception to throw when the first argument is null (assuming it’s not meant to be). Should it be ArgumentNullException, as if it were a normal argument, or should it be NullReferenceException, which is what would’ve happened if the extension method had been an instance method to start with? I recommend the former: it’s still an argument, even if the extension method syntax doesn’t make that obvious.

I see this recommendation as (and from my personal experience): it's always better to check for null, specially for static methods and do not to rely on null values. One exception only if it is the exact purpose of your method, for example ThrowIfNull or IsNullOrEmpty extension methods.

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LINQ methods virtually never have any output they could sensibly provide when they have null parameters. That's not the case here, so it's not a fair comparison. –  Servy May 16 '13 at 16:11
    
@Servy sorry, don't want to argue, but why is that? What is the difference in myString.Where(char.IsDigit) and myString.ToDigitsOnly() ? –  Ilya Ivanov May 16 '13 at 16:13

It doesn't really matter as long as you communicate the behavior well (so that the end-user knows what to expect).

Consider using the built-in XML Documentation Comments to communicate expected behavior.

/// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException">argument is null.</exception>
public string Example( string argument )
{
    if ( argument == null )
        throw new ArgumentNullException();
    return argument.ToString();
}

See MSDN documentation for many examples:

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Suppose I have this:

class A
{
    public void F()
    {
        //do stuff
    }
}

If I then run the following code, what happens?

A a = null;
a.F();

You get a NullReferenceException. So I would say the proper way to write an equivalent extension method would be as follows.

class A
{
}

static class AExtensions
{
    void F(this A a)
    {
        if (a == null)
        {
            throw new NullReferenceException();
        }
        //do stuff
    }
}

However, .NET disagrees with me on this. The standard in .NET is to instead throw an ArgumentException - so it's probably best to do that instead.

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I wouldn't recommend that. You can call that method with AExtensions.F(null). One would expect ArgumentNullException when a null parameter is passed. –  Jim Mischel May 16 '13 at 16:56
1  
@JimMischel True. I tend to 99% of the time treat extension methods as if they were members of the type they're applied to, though. The case where you call them like a static method is unusual though valid. There's really nothing wrong with using the ArgumentException though. I guess if .NET is doing it it's the way to go. –  Timothy Shields May 16 '13 at 16:59
    
The other problem with throwing NullReferenceException is that it doesn't really communicate what the source of the error is. The real error is at the call site, where a null parameter is passed. If your code throws NRE (which it would do anyway, if you just tried to access it), the client is led to believe that the error is in the extension method. This is especially true if the client is using a library for which he doesn't have source. ArgumentNullException tells the client exactly what the problem is. –  Jim Mischel May 17 '13 at 14:41

Simple ; Create another method for String , say IsInValid()

public static bool IsInValid(this string s) { return (s == null) || (s.Length == 0); }

use whereever you wanna check...

Furthermore, you can use this extension anywhere

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