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I have a simple echoprocess.py:

import sys

while True:
    data = sys.stdin.read()
    sys.stdout.write("Here is the data: " + str(data))

And a parentprocess.py

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

proc = Popen(["C:/python27/python.exe", "echoprocess.py"],
             stdin = PIPE,
             sdtout = PIPE)

proc.stdin.write("hello")
print proc.stdout.read()

This just hangs until echoprocess.py is terminated. I want to communicate with this subprocess multiple times without having to restart it again. Is this kind of interprocess communication possible with the Python subprocess module on Windows?

share|improve this question
    
Just added a note regarding output buffering to my answer. Not sure about Windows, but on Linux the one in echoprocess.py is necessary, although the one in parentprocess.py isn't. It's usually safest to always include them for maximum portability. –  Aya May 16 '13 at 17:21
    
It might also be worth looking at the multiprocessing module, which provides an abstraction layer for this sort of inter-process communication. –  Aya May 16 '13 at 17:29
    
That is what I did originally, but I had some initial problems with it on Windows. The Windows requirement to put all all of the code in the if __name__ == "__main__": block seemed to require too much work around of what I already have. –  Michael David Watson May 16 '13 at 17:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The main problem is with the line...

print proc.stdout.read()

The read() method when used with no parameters will read all data until EOF, which will not occur until the subprocess terminates.

You'll probably be okay with line-by-line reading, so you can use...

proc.stdin.write("hello\n")
print proc.stdout.readline()

...otherwise you'll have to work out some others means of delimiting 'messages'.

You'll have to make a similar change to echoprocess.py, i.e. change...

data = sys.stdin.read()

...to...

data = sys.stdin.readline()

You may also have issues with output buffering, so it may be necessary to flush() the buffer after doing a write.


Putting all this together, if you change echoprocess.py to...

import sys

while True:
    data = sys.stdin.readline()
    sys.stdout.write("Here is the data: " + str(data))
    sys.stdout.flush()

...and parentprocess.py to...

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE

proc = Popen(["C:/python27/python.exe", "echoprocess.py"],
             stdin = PIPE,
             stdout = PIPE)

proc.stdin.write("hello\n")
proc.stdin.flush()
print proc.stdout.readline()

...it should work the way you expect it to.

share|improve this answer
    
Works as expected. What exactly does flush do? –  Michael David Watson May 16 '13 at 17:30
1  
@MichaelDavidWatson Well, for efficiency, processes will usually have an internal buffer and calls to write() will actually be stored in the buffer until it reaches a certain size, at which point it'll be passed on to the piped process. Calling flush() forces that to happen immediately, rather than waiting for the buffer to be filled. There's probably a better description on the web somewhere. –  Aya May 16 '13 at 17:37

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