Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class Foo 
  foo: () ->
    console.log("foo method Called")

class Bar extends Foo
  constructor: () ->
    console.log("Bar created")

  bar: () ->
    console.log("bar method called")
    foo

b = new Bar
b.bar()

Results:
Bar created
bar method called
ReferenceError: foo is not defined

How do I call the foo method?

share|improve this question
1  
Try this.foo. –  MMM May 16 '13 at 16:50
    
Have you tried with parenthesis? –  edi9999 May 16 '13 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two problems here.

First, you need to call this.foo (or @foo).

Second, in CoffeScript the last variable mentioned in a function definition is returned, not executed. So if you want to call that function your code needs to look like this:

bar: () ->
    console.log("bar method called")
    this.foo() // or @foo()

Otherwise without the () it will return the function rather than call it. Note that this will also compile to return this.foo(), so if you don't want to return anything, add a blank return on your last line.

share|improve this answer
1  
Correct, but stylistically, most CoffeeScripters would write @foo() instead to call instance methods. –  Alex Wayne May 16 '13 at 17:00
    
@AlexWayne Each to their own ;) –  MMM May 16 '13 at 17:01
    
Thanks! I figured it was something simple :) –  bmurmistro May 16 '13 at 18:27
    
@Michael: I'm pretty sure that without the parentheses the function is not called (executed), you're comparing return foo; with return foo(); (where typeof foo === 'function') –  MMM Mar 17 at 11:05

Use @foo(). functions declared in class are added to the class's prototype. Have a look at the javascript produced by the code here

To call the functions directly added to a function prototype, you will need this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.