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For example, suppose there are 32 numbers (not sorted, range unknown) and 8 CPUs, each computes a single comparison per minute.

If there is just a single CPU, then there needs to be 31 comparisons. But with 8 CPUs, we can compare 16 numbers per minute.

What is the minimum amount of time (in minutes) required to compute the maximum number? (I worked it out to be around 6 minutes but I think it is possible to do in 5, not sure how the algorithm works.)

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Can we assume that there is a central program that instantaneously decides what comparisons to delegate to the 8 CPUs after the previous comparison results are obtained? Or do the 8 CPUs all have to finish their instruction sets entirely before we can aggregate and output the answer? –  torquestomp May 16 '13 at 17:15
3  
That is one slow CPU you've got there :) –  500 - Internal Server Error May 16 '13 at 17:20
    
@torquestomp The CPUs have to finish their comparison. Assume it's a naive (simple) system. –  sunapi386 May 16 '13 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
1) 32 numbers -> compare 8 pairs using 8 CPUs -> 24 numbers
2) 24 numbers -> compare 8 pairs using 8 CPUs -> 16 numbers
3) 16 numbers -> compare 8 pairs using 8 CPUs -> 8 numbers
4) 8 numbers  -> compare 4 pairs using 4 CPUs -> 4 numbers
5) 4 numbers  -> compare all numbers with each other using 6 CPUs (tetrahedron)
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Since you have 4 wasted CPU's at step 4, you can probably randomly pick additional values of different pairs to compare and, if these values turn out to be the maximum in their respective pairs, it's possible to already know the result without the 5th step. –  Dukeling May 17 '13 at 7:28

(Edited) 1st 4 steps are easy

  1. compare 8 pairs (16 numbers) -> 8 winners1
  2. compare 8 pairs (16 numbers) -> 8 winners2
  3. compare 8 pairs (8-winner1 vs 8-winner2) -> 8 winners,
  4. compare 4 pairs -> 4 winners

    Lets say 4 numbers are a, b, c, d

  5. compare 6 pairs (a,b) (a,c) (a,d) (b,c) (b,d) (c,d) -> the Biggest number will win 3 times
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Step four: a=c=e=g=1; b=d=f=h=2. There are four winners. –  Jan Dvorak May 16 '13 at 19:11
    
I assumed all numbers will be unique, but this 4 winner case is a special case where we will only have 2 winners for the step 5. –  sowrov May 16 '13 at 19:17
    
even with unique entries, you have 10,20,11,21,12,22,13,23 => four winners (20,21,22,23) –  Jan Dvorak May 16 '13 at 19:19
    
Yes, you are right! I am removing my reply :) –  sowrov May 16 '13 at 19:25
    
@Dvorak: Hope this time it will work :-? –  sowrov May 16 '13 at 19:38

Think of it like an NCAA Bracket, where you let each core handle a game/minute. Throw in the tetrahedron logic for the last 4, and you save yourself 1 minute.

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What's a NCAA bracket? –  sunapi386 May 17 '13 at 2:33

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