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Context: I'm developing a client-server application that is fairly solid most of the time, despite frequent network problems, outages, broken pipes, and so on. I use non-blocking sockets, select(), and OpenSSL to deliver messages between one or more nodes in a cluster, contingent on application-level heartbeats. Messages are queued and not removed from the queue until the entire message has been transferred and all the SSL_write()s return successfully. I maintain two sockets for each relationship, one incoming and one outgoing. I do this for a reason, and that's because it's much easier to detect a failed connection (very frequent) on a write than it is on a read. If a client is connecting, and I already have a connection, I replace it. Basically, the client performing the write is responsible for detecting errors and initiating a new connection (which will then replace the existing (dead) read connection on the server). This has worked well for me with one exception.

Alas, I'm losing messages. 99.9% of the time, the messages go through fine. But every now and then, I'll send, and I have no errors detected on either side for a few minutes... and then I'll get an error on the socket. The problem is that SSL_write has already returned successfully.

Let me guess: if I was blocking this would be fine, but since I'm non-blocking, I don't wait for the read on my remote end. As long as my TCP buffer can fit more, I keep stuffing things in the pipe. And when my socket goes poof, I lose anything in that buffer yet to be delivered?

How can I deal with this? Are application-level acks really necessary? (I'd rather not travel down the long road of complicated lost-acks and duplicate message complexity) Is there an elegant way to know what message I've lost? Or is there a way I can delay removal from my queue until I know it has been delivered? (Without an ack, how?)

Thanks for any help in advance.

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I would say application level acks are necessary. But hopefully somebody can suggest an easier solution. Sounds like your connection times out. Can you elaborate on what error you get from SSL_write when messages are lost? Or perhaps even from the socket it self. –  thuovila May 16 '13 at 18:13
    
Sorry, I should have included the specific error. I'm receiving errors via: (getsockopt(svr_conns[i].cn_socket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_ERROR, &con_err, &len) Typically conn_err is reported as ECONNRESET, or in rare circumstances ETIMEDOUT. –  Ahhmyface May 16 '13 at 19:00
    
Maybe it cheers you up, that using a blocking write would not help. That only blocks until data can be written to the kernel side tcp buffer, so it doesnt wait for "read on remote end". either. –  thuovila May 16 '13 at 19:17
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