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I am studying Prolog DCG grammar* and **parse tree on the Ivan Bratko book: "Programming for Artificial Intelligence"

I am finding some difficulties with the following example that provide a DCG grammar that create a parse tree from a string that belong to the defined language.

The defined language is a list of moves of a robotic arm that can be only of two type: up and down so [up,up,down,up,up] belongs to the language defined by my DCG grammar.

The program provide also a meaning/2 predicate that interprets the parse tree associated with a certain string and that mean the distance crossed by robot arm (Whereas it is associated with a move up the value +1, and the value -1 to a move down)

So for example for the list [up,up,down,up,up], the mean/2 predicate calculate a +3 distance

This is the code of my example (work well):

move(move(Step)) --> step(Step).
move(move(Step, Move)) --> step(Step), move(Move).

step(step(up)) --> [up].
step(step(down)) --> [down].

/* Take the parse tree of a string that belong to the language defined by the DCC grammar and
   calculate the total distance whereas that an up move give a +1 distance and a down move
   give -1 distance
*/
meaning(move(Step, Move), Dist):- 
                                  /* Calculate the distance given by the current step node 
                                     (which can be +1 or -1) */
                  meaning(Step, D1),
                  /* Calculate the distance given by the current moove node
                                     (which must be calculated recursively on a subtree having 
                                      a moove node as root */
                  meaning(Move, D2),
                  /* The final distance series of moves is the distance of the
                                     current step + the distance diven from the moves in the
                                     moove subtree */
                  Dist is (D1 + D2).

meaning(step(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).
meaning(move(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).

% step(up) means that the distance is +1
meaning(step(up), 1).

% step(down) means that the distance is -1
meaning(step(down), -1).

So I have the meaning/2 predicate that take a parse tree and calculate the total distance of the moves.

So I have 2 BASE CASE that rappresent the distance value associated to a single move (to a step), that can be +1 for the up step and -1 for the down step:

meaning(step(up), 1).
meaning(step(down), -1).

The meaning/2 take a parse tree that, as defined by the DCG grammar, have a move node as root: this root will have a left child that is a step node (so it is a single move, so it have a specific distance +1 or -1 associated to it) and a right child that is a move node (so it rappresent another subtree)

So the total distance is the sum of the distance of the current step that is +1 or -1 (the left child of the current move root) + the distance in right subtree.

I think that this is correct and this is pretty clear for me

The thing that I don't understand is what represent to me these two predicates in the code:

meaning(step(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).
meaning(move(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).

I can not stick them in my reasoning :-(

share|improve this question
1  
Was it really necessary to copy the entire question and book section for help on those four lines of code? Also, did you try just running the code? It's obvious what those rules do: they let you call meaning/2 on wrapped facts directly from the DCG. They simply unwrap the extra struct layer. –  Daniel Lyons May 16 '13 at 17:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We use these rules like so,

4 ?- phrase(move(X), [up,up,down,up,up]).
X = move(step(up), move(step(up), move(step(down), move(step(up), 
      move(step(up)))))) ;
false.

5 ?- meaning($X,N).
N = 3 ;
false.

The term produced is highly nested:

move(step(up),                           % move/2: step/1 , 
     move(step(up),                      %   move/2: step/1 ,
          move(step(down),               %     move/2: step/1 ,
               move(step(up),            %       move/2: step/1 ,
                    move(step(up))))))   %         move/1: step/1 .

The code that you ask about, strips away the functors from the compound terms, getting to the "meat" of it, i.e. up or down atom arguments:

(2) meaning(step(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).

"to find the ''meaning'' of a unary compound term step(X), is the same as to find the ''meaning'' of X".

(3) meaning(move(Step), Dist):- meaning(Step, Dist).

"to find the ''meaning'' of a unary compound term move(X), is the same as to find the ''meaning'' of X".

(4) base cases: ''meaning'' is given as 1 or -1 for up or down atoms.

meaning(step(up), 1).                    % clashes with rule (2)
meaning(step(down), -1).                 % clashes with rule (2)

(1) And the main case deals with binary compound terms with the functor move:

meaning(move(Step, Move), Dist):- 
    meaning(Step, D1),
    meaning(Move, D2),
    Dist is (D1 + D2).

move/2 is a custom version of (non-empty) list, '.'/2, actually:

1 ?- write_canonical([1,2,3]).
'.'(1,'.'(2,'.'(3,[])))
true.

2 ?- write_canonical([step(up),step(down),step(up)]).
'.'(step(up),'.'(step(down),'.'(step(up),[])))
true.

And meaning/2 is a fold.

share|improve this answer
    
tnx so much !!! Now this is clear. –  AndreaNobili May 17 '13 at 14:16
    
I apologize, if sometimes I put long question but otherwise I'm afraid of not being clear in the questions –  AndreaNobili May 17 '13 at 14:17
2  
@AndreaNobili you've come along nicely, start believing your abilities more and paraphrase and summarize; even more so, let Prolog code speak for itself mode. :) –  Will Ness May 17 '13 at 16:32
    
:-) tnx for all :-) –  AndreaNobili May 18 '13 at 14:14

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