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I have the following method and Resharper tells me that the if(drivers != null) will always be true, but I don't know why and it tells me that the catch block is redundant, but can someone explain why? Here is the code:

public List<Driver> GetDrivers(int id)
        {
            if (_context != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    var drivers = _context.Drivers.Where(x=> x.id == id).ToList();


                    //Always true
                    if (drivers != null)
                    {
                        //code
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        //Heuristically unreachable
                        throw new Exception("No Driver");
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    throw;
                }
            }

            return drivers;
        }
  1. Why is if(drivers != null) always true? Can't drivers be null? If it is correct, I am assuming there is a default value for drivers that is not null.
  2. I am assumming that it is telling the else statement is unreachable because it thinks driver can never be null, but is this the case?
  3. It tells me the catch is redundant, but besides being null, which resharper says it can't, isn't there another exception that can be thrown that would cause the catch to execute?
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're using .Where, which returns a collection. If there's no match it will be an empty collection, therefore not null.

I think you want to use .SingleOrDefault instead of .Where.

share|improve this answer
    
So, I guess I could then check for drivers.Count, correct? Why when I hover over Where, does it say it can throw an ArgumentNullException? Is it talking about the arguments in the Where clause or what Where returns? – Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 17:45
1  
Yes, in this case you can check for drivers.Count. However, I like to be explicit about my intentions so in this case I would do a .Any with returns a Boolean. I think that would be the most efficient. – Mike Cole May 16 '13 at 17:47
    
What difference does it make if I use SingleOrDefault instead of Where? – Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 17:48
    
Ok, not too caught up on the efficieny of these things. Thanks for the Any pointer. – Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 17:49
1  
I like to be explicit with my expectations, so I would code that way. So yes => "I except there to only be one instance of this Driver" – Mike Cole May 16 '13 at 17:53

Well the catch is redundant indeed, you're not doing anything in it, simply re-throwing the exact same exception:

catch (Exception ex)
{
   // would make more sense if for example you're writing to log file

   // otherwise this will be thrown anyway (even without the catch)
   throw;
}

Also, this never returns null, it could have 0 entries, but it won't be null:

_context.Drivers.Where(x=> x.id == id).ToList();
share|improve this answer
1  
I plan on adding logging to it, so I guess it won't be redundant then. – Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 17:47
1  
Yes, totally, then it makes perfect sense. – Dimitar Dimitrov May 16 '13 at 17:47

The try blockis redundant because you're just throwing the error again and not doing any additional handling. If you remove the try/catch the exception will bubble up anyways. You don't need to throw it.

And .Where returns a collection. It'll never be null, but it might be empty.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so if I add logging for example, it is not redundant anymore? – Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 17:46
    
@Xaisoft, yes... – Mike Cole May 16 '13 at 17:48

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