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The code base where I work has code similar to the following in a few places:

Dim i As Integer
Dim ints As New ArrayList
ints.Add(1)

'... lets say we add more Integers

For each i in ints.ToArray(GetType(Integer))
'Do something
Next

I'm wondering what benefit is gained from the .ToArray(GetType(Integer)) since omitting that has nearly the same result at run-time. That is calling For Each i In ints. The only difference I see is that if some type other than Integer is in the ArrayList the resulting error message is more helpful if you do not call .ToArray()

Why would I want to use ToArray(type) on an ArrayList if I will be doing a For Each loop where the type is already specified?

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You would not want to call ToArray unless you needed an array, say to pass it to a method that only accepted Integer() as a parameter. –  vcsjones May 16 '13 at 17:46
1  
Maybe they want to force an error sooner rather than later, if "ints" contains a non-Integer. For example, if you have 1000 items in there, it is probably better to fail at the beginning rather than at the 999th element. –  Markku K. May 16 '13 at 17:49
    
Why are you using arraylist in the first place? List(Of T) is better in every way possible. –  Joel Coehoorn May 16 '13 at 17:51
    
@JoelCoehoorn I have no idea. As far as I can see, there is no reason. Possibly ignorance? –  Daniel Cook May 16 '13 at 17:52
1  
@MarkkuK. That's a good point. Failing before performing any of the loop code could be a significant improvement. –  Daniel Cook May 16 '13 at 17:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why would I want to use ToArray(type) on an ArrayList if I will be doing a For Each loop where the type is already specified?

In general, you likely don't want to do this. Calling ToArray() actually creates a new array of your values.

The one place where this could be beneficial is if your loop is going to modify the ArrayList. You can't modify most collections while enumerating them, so you'd get an exception. By adding the ToArray call, you are enumerating a copy of the collection (as an array), so you can modify the original.

Note that, in general, if that's the case, I'd use ToList(), and not ToArray(), as it's typically a bit more efficient (often one fewer memory allocation). I'd also recommend using List(Of Integer) instead of ArrayList for any new code, as you get type safety.

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Agreed. I would have mentioned how I wouldn't use an ArrayList in the first place, but felt that was another issue entirely. –  Daniel Cook May 16 '13 at 17:50

You do not need to call ToArray on an ArrayList in a For each loop: i is already declared as Integer, so the type conversion will be performed for you automatically.

Sometimes you may need to call an array on results of a query to copy the data into memory. One place where it gives you advantages is copying results of a database query into memory, because you can close the connection sooner. In addition, calling ToList could help you in situations when a query would otherwise reference a modified variable, or when IEnumerable is expensive to produce multiple times.

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i is an Integer, but ints could be something else. –  user195488 May 16 '13 at 17:49
    
@0A0D ints could be something else, but if it's incompatible, both ToArray and For each will fail. Assuming that ToArray does not fail, For each shouldn't fail either. –  dasblinkenlight May 16 '13 at 17:51
    
Can you coerce say a long into an int by using GetType? I don't know –  user195488 May 16 '13 at 17:52
    
@0A0D My VB exposure is rather limited, but I am nearly certain that longs inside ints would make both ToArray and For each fail. –  dasblinkenlight May 16 '13 at 17:55
    
I think you are right.. GetType seems to be for equality checks, not for changing the type like the original author of this code maybe intended. –  user195488 May 16 '13 at 17:57

There are two reasons you might call .ToArray() on that ArrayList:

  1. So you don't need to cast the items in the ArrayList. The array is strongly typed, and so putting them there first means the compiler knows that everything in the arraylist is an integer.
  2. So you could pass the arraylist to a method that expects an array as argument.
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Defensive programming in an old code base. Presumably they didn't have "List(Of Integer)" available at the time. There are a couple reasons you want to fail at the "For Each" statement (if "ints" contains a non-Integer) rather than later on in the loop:

  1. Obviously, you don't want to waste time. The operations inside the loop may take a long time. Better to fail before beginning the loop than at iteration 99999.
  2. You may want to do "all or none" of the operations on the whole ArrayList.
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In your case, change to this code and you don't need to:

Dim i As Integer
Dim ints As New Generic.List(Of Integer)
ints.Add(1)
'... lets say we add more Integers

For each i in ints
'Do something
Next

ToArray comes handy when dealing with LINQ results. If your collection size is measurable, you can do ToArray. Most older .NET functions prefer to use arrays. Good example is String.Join. So you may need to use it often for type compatibility between calls. Another reason to do so is that arrays are easier to inspect in debugger.

In any case, you should always justify the need. If your goal is strict typing, better use types that were created for this purpose, such as the above Generic.List(Of T).

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