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This code works

  type UserNode(myid:int64, labeled:bool) = 
      static member SkypeId (x:UserNode) = x.SkypeI

      member this.SkypeI = myid

Yet this one does not : "SkypeId is not an instance method"

The only difference I think I have is the "d" and the end of SkypeI

  type UserNode(myid:int64, labeled:bool) = 
      static member SkypeId (x:UserNode) = x.SkypeId

      member this.SkypeId = myid

What am I missing here... ?

Ok oddly enough it recognizes SkypeId as the static method being defined....

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2  
this would refer to a currently executing instance, which would not have SkypeId since it is a static member, not an instance member. –  jbabey May 16 '13 at 17:48
    
Do you really need the static method? It seems odd to be able to do UserNode.SkypeId x, since you wouldn't gain much syntax wise. –  Guvante May 16 '13 at 17:52
    
indeed, but I find it strange that the "x." would not scope the method name.... –  nicolas May 16 '13 at 17:52
    
@Guvante it can look of little use and clearly there is a tradeoff. I write custom equality etc.. so function is better as I can factor out compositionally –  nicolas May 16 '13 at 17:54
    
@nicolas: What method? SkypeId is an instance field, not a method. –  Guvante May 16 '13 at 17:54
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This restriction is part of the Common Language Specification (CLS), it is not specific to F#.

From the CLI specification, CLS Rule 5 states that:

All names introduced in a CLS-compliant scope shall be distinct independent of kind, except where the names are identical and resolved via overloading. That is, while the CTS allows a single type to use the same name for a method and a field, the CLS does not.

So the Common Type System (CTS) does allow this, as the following compilable IL shows

.class public auto ansi sealed Foo
extends [mscorlib]System.Object
{
    .method public instance void .ctor()
    {
        ldarg.0
        call instance void [mscorlib]System.Object::.ctor()
        ret
    }

    .field public int32 Bar

    .method public void Bar()
    {
        ldstr "Instance method"
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
        ret
    }

    .method static public void Bar()
    {
        ldstr "Static method"
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
        ret
    }
}

But you wont be able to access all the members of the above class from a CLS compliant language like F# or C#.

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Full source of the IL example available here –  Leaf Garland May 16 '13 at 21:19
    
interesting, thank you for the reference. –  nicolas May 17 '13 at 8:06
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member does not follow the same rules as let, all members of a class are available at one time (in fact it is a useful trick to pull of complex interdependencies in some edge cases).

Unfortunately the rules for resolving class members are often complex in .NET languages and the distinction between static and instance is sometimes hard to come by.

I don't know offhand if there is a syntax fix for this exact issue but in general avoiding identical names always works as you mentioned.

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In c# it would look like this:

public class UserNode
{
    private readonly int _myid;

    public UserNode(int myid)
    {
        _myid = myid;
    }

    public static int SkypeId(UserNode x)
    {
        return x.SkypeId;
    }

    public int SkypeId
    {
        get { return _myid; }
    }
}

We got two errors: - The type 'xxx.UserNode' already contains a definition for 'SkypeId'; - And inside static method "Cannot convert expression type 'method group' to return type int". As Leaf Garland wrote there can't be method and property with same name. But overloaded method works:

type UserNode(myid:int64, labeled:bool) = 
  static member SkypeId (x:UserNode) = x.SkypeId()

  member this.SkypeId() = myid
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