Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am using Ada for the first time and have a txt file with the following written on it

      23.000000#:599.659058,-67.651642

I want to add an R, in a newline in the archive so it ends like this

      23.000000#:599.659058,-67.651642
      R,

For that I am using the following code

  Open (File => out_parcial_variante1, Name => "c.txt", Mode => out_file);
    new_line(out_parcial_variante1);
    put(File => out_parcial_variante1, Item=> "R,");
  close(out_parcial_variante1);

However doing this deletes all previous written data in the archive, leaving only the new line and a sole R,

How do I exactly append to the end of the file this text, I can seem to find the function and this is the only way I can think of

share|improve this question
    
+1 for still using ada – stdcall May 16 '13 at 17:49
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try append_file instead of out_file: Open (File => out_parcial_variante1, Name => "c.txt", Mode => Append_File);

share|improve this answer

Just to elaborate on the accepted answer: "out_file" mode creates a brand new file to write to (wiping out any file already there). Similarly, parameters of mode "out" have no defined initial value (even if your actual parameter you supply may have been initialized to something), and should not be read from before initialized. In Ada, "out" and "in" mean what they say. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Sometimes I wish they'd named "Append_File" to "In_Out_File" for consistency with the argument above. :-) – T.E.D. May 17 '13 at 12:56
1  
Text_IO.Append_File doesn't let you go back in the file. Direct_IO, which does, has mode Inout_File. – Simon Wright May 18 '13 at 11:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.