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I came across code similar to that below which is legal, albeit not very clever. Two stack variables in the same function in scope at the same time with the same name is legal but it can cause problems. (Read: I just wasted half an hour debugging this). At warning level 4 on VS2010 (the highest level), I would have hoped it would have caught this kind of thing. Am I missing something, or is it time to hit to whole code base with lint for a once over? Would a static analysis tool such as lint even pick up name clashes like this?

   char *x = strchr(Buffer,' ');
   if (x)
   {
     *x = 0;
     x++;
     char *x = strchr(x,' ') 
     if (x)
        *x = 0;
   }
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1  
GCC does better on this AFAIR ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 16 '13 at 18:13
    
they're not of the same scope. one x is function scope, one is block scope. –  orzechowskid May 16 '13 at 18:18
    
I don't think is easy for this to cause a warning. Many times it's the thing someone wants (e.g. formal parameter name and class member - usually you don't want to invent new names) –  Ghita May 16 '13 at 18:19
    
@Ghita "usually you don't want to invent new names" why not? –  Luchian Grigore May 16 '13 at 18:27
1  
@LuchianGrigore Yeas, in that case sucks. But for "properties" I prefer to be lazy.. –  Ghita May 16 '13 at 18:33
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

PC-Lint will detect this. The following code:

main (int argc, char *argv []) 
{
    char *x = 0;
    if (x)
    {
        char *x = 0;
    }
}

Gives a warning:

main.cpp  6  Warning 578: Declaration of symbol 'x' hides symbol 'x' (line 3)
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1  
Weak rule. So many people write like this. There will be many false positives. –  Andrey Cpp May 16 '13 at 19:51
1  
@AndreyCpp Still not a good idea. There is a reason this rule is part of MISRA. Likewise, it's a routine check in all the static analysis tools I've used. Take a look at this link: securecoding.cert.org/confluence/display/seccode/… –  Throwback1986 May 16 '13 at 21:26
    
Time to dig out my copy of PC-Lint again. I used to use it regularly but have gotten out of the habit, –  Shane MacLaughlin May 17 '13 at 11:38
    
@AndreyCpp - Not sure if you're arguing against using PC-Lint or not. There is no issue with false positives if you normally code like this, because PC-Lint has complete configurability to shut off any error you wish. –  Steve Fallows May 19 '13 at 23:52
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PVS-Studio will detect this.

void F(char *Buffer)
{
  char *x = strchr(Buffer,' ');
  if (x)
  {
    *x = 0;
    x++;
    char *x = strchr(x,' ');
    if (x)
      *x = 0;
  }
}

PVS-Studio message: V573 Uninitialized variable 'x' was used. The variable was used to initialize itself. test.cpp 46

Yes. In this code "char *x = strchr(x,' ')" new variable 'x' used for init herself. Example for explain:

int *P(int *p) { return p; }

void A()
{
  int x = 1;
  {
    int *x = P(x); //ok ( used: int *x )
  }
  {
    int *y = P(x); //compile error (used: int x)
  }
}
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Looks nice, but a bit outside my budget. I'll try digging out my old copy of PC-Lint and see how it fares. –  Shane MacLaughlin May 17 '13 at 11:29
    
@Shane MacLaughlin Write to us. Possible options. Especially if your project is free. –  Andrey Cpp May 18 '13 at 19:44
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Edit: I didn't notice this when I wrote the original answer (below). The code you've posted is illegal, and causes undefined behavior. The offending line is this one:

char *x = strchr(x,' ');

Here the x within the strchr call does not refer to the x defined in the enclosing scope, but to the x defined previously on the same line. Hence that line reads from an uninitialized variable, which results in undefined behavior. From the C++ standard,

§3.3.2/1 [basic.scope.pdecl]
The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (Clause 8) and before its initializer (if any), except as noted below. [ Example:

   int x = 12;
   { int x = x; }

Here the second x is initialized with its own (indeterminate) value. —end example ]

GCC does complain if the corresponding line in the example below is changed to

int x = 21 + x; // generates "warning: x is used uninitialized in this function"

And duplicating your strchr example on VS2012 generates this warning (at /W1 and above):

warning C4700: uninitialized local variable 'x' used

Original answer follows (not entirely accurate):

There's nothing illegal about the code. You've introduced a new scope by adding braces, and you're allowed to define variables within the new scope even if those variable names have been previously defined in the enclosing scope.

All references to the variable after the new definition will refer to the local variable instead of the one in the enclosing scope, until the lifetime of the local variable ends. The following code produces no warnings on GCC even when compiled with -pedantic -Wall -Wextra

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  int x = 42;
  {
      std::cout << x << '\n';
      int x = 21;
      std::cout << x << '\n';
  }
  std::cout << x << '\n';
}

Output:

42
21
42

I don't know whether lint or another static analysis tool will pick out such things either. It is legal, but not advisable.

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Yikes, you're original answer was actually correct and the issue in my example was unintentional, but thanks for the edited answer anyway. I'll leave my question as is, warts and all, as your answer is useful in that context. –  Shane MacLaughlin May 17 '13 at 11:32
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