Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query:

drivers.Select(d => { d.id = 0; d.updated = DateTime.Now; return d; }).ToList();

drivers is a List which comes in with different id's and updated values, so I am changing the values in the Select, but is the proper way to do it. I already know that I am not reassigning drivers to drivers because Resharper complains about it, so I guess it would be better if it was:

drivers = drivers.Select(d => { d.id = 0; d.updated = DateTime.Now; return d; }).ToList();

but is this still the way someone should assign new values to each element in the drivers List?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Linq side effects –  nawfal May 17 '13 at 20:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Although this looks innocent, especially in combination with a ToList call that executes the code immediately, I would definitely stay away from modifying anything as part of a query: the trick is so unusual that it would trip up readers of your program, even experienced ones, especially if they never saw this before.

There's nothing wrong with foreach loops - the fact that you can do it with LINQ does not mean that you should be doing it.

share|improve this answer
    
I would use ForEach for single line statement, not for something that requires curly braces (multiple statements). foreach is indeed better here. –  nawfal May 16 '13 at 18:17
    
You are correct, it tripped me up :) I agree with your second statement as well. –  Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 18:18
7  
+1 LINQ should not be used for object mutation. –  recursive May 16 '13 at 18:18
2  
But if I did use a ForEach, would that be the better alternative as far as readability? –  Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 18:19
1  
@Xaisoft ForEach could work better, but it is not part of LINQ: it is defined on List<T>, not on IEnumerable<T>, so I am nearly certain that it was built with the idea of modification in mind (as long as the list itself stays intact, of course). Using a foreach loop vs. List<T>.ForEach is a question of personal preference. –  dasblinkenlight May 16 '13 at 18:25

NEVER DO THIS. A query should be a query; it should be non-destructively asking questions of a data source. If you want to cause a side effect then use a foreach loop; that's what it's for. Use the right tool for the job.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you Eric. The only way to know the right way is to know you are doing it wrong in the first place :) –  Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 18:29

Ok I will make an answer myself.

Xaisoft, Linq queries, be it lambda expression or query expression, shouldn't be used to mutate list. Hence your Select

drivers = drivers.Select(d => { d.id = 0; d.updated = DateTime.Now; return d; }).ToList();

is bad style. It confuses/unreadable, not standard, and against Linq philosophy. Another poor style of achieving the end result is:

drivers.Any(d => { d.id = 0; d.updated = DateTime.Now; return false; });

But that's not to say ForEach on List<T> is inappropriate. It finds uses in cases like yours, but do not mix mutation with Linq query, thats all. I prefer to write something like:

drivers.ForEach(d => d.updated = DateTime.Now);

Its elegant and understandable. Since it doesn't deal with Linq, its not confusing too. I don't like that syntax for multiple statements (as in your case) inside the lambda. It's a little less readable and harder to debug when things get complex. In your case I prefer a straight foreach loop.

foreach (var d in drivers)
{ 
    d.id = 0; 
    d.updated = DateTime.Now; 
}

Personally I like ForEach on IEnumerable<T> as a terminating call to Linq expression (ie, if the assignment is not meant to be a query but an execution).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the good explanation. –  Xaisoft May 16 '13 at 19:26
    
@Xaisoft Actually the thing I hate about ForEach on List<T> is the fact they appear by default. I don't think its fit as a framework level construct. I prefer such higher level constructs coming in at user's discretion, as extension or so. If tailor-made stuffs helps the end user, well go for it. There is a lot geeky going in there and its up to individuals to select if its production fit or not. Here is another switch-case implemented for Type, well its awesome. Embrace it or turn away. Don't bitch about it.. –  nawfal May 17 '13 at 9:48
    
Who is bitching about it and what is it? –  Xaisoft May 17 '13 at 12:38
    
@Xaisoft whoever does, din mean anyone in particular :) –  nawfal May 17 '13 at 12:43
    
Ah Ok, I get you know ;) –  Xaisoft May 17 '13 at 12:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.