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I came across a JS file which was built in a strange manner:

var modal = (function(){
  var method = {};

  // Center the modal in the viewport
  method.center = function () {};

  // Open the modal
  method.open = function (settings) {};

  // Close the modal
  method.close = function () {};

  return method;
}());

I understand the part of wrapping a function into the "modal" object, but why bind all the functions to method and then return it at the end?

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Seems like the object should be called methods... –  fncomp May 16 '13 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is a design pattern to group functionalities into modules, and to get rid of global variables. This leads to better code.

  1. The function call creates a 'closure' i.e. a scope for all the variables declared within that function, they stay even after the function has exited, and they are not visible outside the function.

           var modal = (function(){
           var method = {};
           // Center the modal in the viewport
           method.center = function () {};
    
          // Open the modal
          method.open = function (settings) {};
    
          // Close the modal
          method.close = function () {};
    
          return method;
        }());  // This function call here creates a "closure" ( scope ) 
    
  2. Now to make certain members of the module available outside the module, they need to be returned from the function, here return method does exactly that, making method a public object of the module , which can be used outside.

  3. Instead of creating invididual variables like open, close etc, the related functions are assigned as properties ( keys of the object ) to the main method object, so that returning the single object makes all the related functions accesible. This also serves the purpose of reducing the number of identifiers (names ) within the closure scope.

Read this very good article on this modular pattern :

http://www.yuiblog.com/blog/2007/06/12/module-pattern/

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I could be wrong, but I don't think this code actually creates a closure. I don't see any local variables being preserved by the function scope. –  Llepwryd May 16 '13 at 18:36
    
Yes, for the code provided,there aren't any. But about the pattern. –  DhruvPathak May 16 '13 at 18:45
    
Ah, gotcha; I misunderstood. –  Llepwryd May 16 '13 at 19:21

For that specific code, there is no advantage. It does the same as:

var modal = {

  // Center the modal in the viewport
  center: function () {},

  // Open the modal
  open: function (settings) {},

  // Close the modal
  close: function () {},

};

However, if you put a local variable in the function, that's a different matter:

var modal = (function(){

  // a variable that is private to the object
  var local = 'hello world';

  var method = {};

  // Center the modal in the viewport
  method.center = function () {};

  // Open the modal
  method.open = function (settings) {};

  // Close the modal
  method.close = function () {};

  return method;
}());

Now all the methods in the object can access the private variable, but it's not directly reachable from outside the object.

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