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I just picked up Pandas to do with some data analysis work in my biology research. Turns out one of the proteins I'm analyzing is called 'NA'.

I have a matrix with pairwise 'HA, M1, M2, NA, NP...' on the column headers, and the same as "row headers" (for the biologists who might read this, I'm working with influenza).

When I import the data into Pandas directly from a CSV file, it reads the "row headers" as 'HA, M1, M2...' and then NA gets read as NaN. Is there any way to stop this? The column headers are fine - 'HA, M1, M2, NA, NP etc...'

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for the stupid hack solution, you can do search/replace in the csv and rename NA to something like NA_safe. –  flies May 16 '13 at 21:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Turn off NaN detection this way: pd.read_csv(filename, keep_default_na=False)

I originally suggested na_filter=False, which gets the job done. But, if I understand Jeff's comments below, this is a cleaner solution.

Example:

In [1]: pd.read_csv('test')
Out[1]:[4]: pd.read_csv('test', keep_default_na=False)
Out[4]:1   2
2   3
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perhaps also worth mentioning na_values :) –  Andy Hayden May 16 '13 at 19:57
    
Yes. Speaking of, it seems odd to me that neither na_values=None (the default) nor na_values=[] suppresses NaN detection in this case. –  Dan Allan May 16 '13 at 20:02
    
"Additional strings to recognize as NA/NaN." But yeah... –  Andy Hayden May 16 '13 at 20:20
3  
FYI na_filter is a different type of option, meant to 'turn off' nan detection entirely, whereas na_values allows new/different values to be detected, and to complicate things, keep_na_filter allows you to NOT use the default na values...! maybe need an example in the docs / cookbook! –  Jeff May 16 '13 at 21:15
3  
also to note, turning off nan detection results in the dtype of the column (if it say has mixed string/ints) to be object, not in general a good thing, you DO want to convert to base types whenever possible for efficiency –  Jeff May 16 '13 at 21:17

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