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Hi I am writing test case to test some method. But method throws an exception. Am I doing it correctly?

private void testNumber(String word, int number) {
    try {
        assertEquals(word,  service.convert(number));
    } catch (OutOfRangeNumberException e) {
        Assert.fail("Test failed : " + e.getMessage());
    }
}

@Test
public final void testZero() {
    testNumber("zero", 0);
}

if i pass -45 then it will fail with OutOfRangeException but I am not able to test specific exception like @Test (Expected...)

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3 Answers 3

An unexpected exception is a test failure, so you neither need nor want to catch one.

@Test
public void canConvertStringsToDecimals() {
    String str = "1.234";
    Assert.assertEquals(1.234, service.convert(str), 1.0e-4);
}

Until service does not throw an IllegalArgumentException because str has a decimal point in it, that will be a simple test failure.

An expected exception should be handled by the optional expected argument of @Test.

@Test(expected=NullPointerException.class)
public void cannotConvertNulls() {
    service.convert(null);
}

If the programmer was lazy and threw Exception, or if he had service return 0.0, the test will fail. Only an NPE will succeed. Note that subclasses of the expected exception also work. That's rare for NPEs, but common with IOExceptions and SQLExceptions.

In the rare case that you want to test for a specific exception message, you use the newish ExpectedException JUnit @Rule.

@Rule
public ExpectedException thrown= ExpectedException.none();
@Test
public void messageIncludesErrantTemperature() {
    thrown.expect(IllegalArgumentException.class);
    thrown.expectMessage("-400"); // Tests that the message contains -400.
    temperatureGauge.setTemperature(-400);
}

Now, unless the setTemperature throws an IAE and the message contains the temperature the user was trying to set, the test fails. This rule can be used in more sophisticated ways.


Your example can best be handled by:

private void testNumber(String word, int number)
        throws OutOfRangeNumberException {
    assertEquals(word,  service.convert(number));
}

@Test
public final void testZero()
        throws OutOfRangeNumberException {
    testNumber("zero", 0);
}

You can inline testNumber; now, it does not help much. You can turn this into a parametrized test class.

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You don't need to catch the exception to fail the test. Just let it go (by declaring throws) and it will fail anyway.

Another case is when you actually expect the exception, then you put fail at the end of try block.

For example:

@Test
public void testInvalidNumber() {
  try {
      String dummy = service.convert(-1));
      Assert.fail("Fail! Method was expected to throw an exception because negative numbers are not supported.")
  } catch (OutOfRangeException e) {
      // expected
  }
}

You can use this kind of test to verify if your code is properly validating input and handles invalid input with a proper exception.

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1  
ExpectedException is the preferred way to test for expected exceptions. –  John B May 17 '13 at 10:32
    
I agree and I've already upvoted Eric's answer. –  javadeveloper May 17 '13 at 10:48
    
You only need ExpectedException if you need to check the structure of the exception. For example, CmisExceptions are supposed to have a specifc fault reason set inside them. I've had to write tests to check that, and I used Hamcrest matchers for that purpose. If you just expect an exception, use the argument to @Test. –  Eric Jablow May 17 '13 at 16:43
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Remove the try-catch block and add throws Exception to your test method, like:

@Test
public final void testZero() throws Exception {
    assertEquals("zero",  service.convert(0));
}

JUnit expects failing tests will throw Exceptions, your catching them is just stopping JUnit from being able to report them properly. Also this way the expected property on the @Test annotation will work.

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