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I was surprised that this code works:

string category = null;
Category Category = null;
int categoryId = 0;

var products = repository.Products
    .Where(p => category == null || p.CategoryID == categoryId)
    .ToList();

yet the code below fails:

string category = null;
Category Category = null;
int categoryId = 0;

var products = repository.Products
    .Where(p => category == null || p.CategoryID == Category.CategoryID)
    .ToList();

I know the issue is that even though I'm using the || operator-- it doesn't quite work as I would think it would.

In the second example Why does Category get looked at-- even though the category value is null. Wouldn't it get short circuited?

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1  
How does it fail? –  mikeTheLiar May 16 '13 at 20:51
1  
It looks like you're mixing up category and Category? –  itsme86 May 16 '13 at 20:51
2  
Wouldn't it get short circuited? It's being executed by the query provider. It's not executing C# code at all, so the semantics of the C# || operator don't apply. –  Servy May 16 '13 at 20:51
    
IEnumerable -> lambda expressions. IQueryable -> expression trees. Same API. LINQ magic. –  YK1 May 16 '13 at 21:31
    
servy's comment is important to understand. The lambda is converted into an expression tree. Look at it in debugger. What the provider does with the expression is up to it. | versus || is not port of the provider semantics rules. –  phil soady May 17 '13 at 1:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Your "OR" is being sent to the database as SQL. Entity Framework has to evaluate Category in order to construct the proper SQL that gets sent to the database. In your first example, you didn't give Entity Framework that same problem. It's not a matter of short-circuiting, it's a matter of translating your expression (which includes the OR) into the proper query.

To be clear: if your query were happening in memory in Linq-to-Objects (as an example), your expectation that it could short-circuit and avoid dereferencing null would be correct. But it is not. The entire expression is being translated to SQL, which means it needs to evaluate Category (which you have initialized to null) to obtain the CategoryID, and your problem arises.

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1  
I would just think that Entity framework would see that category == null, so that it would be able to construct the SQL statement without actually caring about the Category object. I guess I wonder why it has to get sent to the database in the first place. –  ek_ny May 16 '13 at 21:07
1  
@ek_ny The query provider could, in theory, have been written to do that. This one simply wasn't. If the query provider wanted to it most certainly could attempt to evaluate the first operand of the || operator to a constant value and, if true, ignore the second operand. It would seem that they choose not to take the time to do so. –  Servy May 16 '13 at 21:09
1  
@ek_ny, Perhaps EF actually would determine that the boolean expression would always result in true and elide it when the final SQL is rendered, but that optimization could happen later than first evaluating the operands in the given expression. Make sense? –  Anthony Pegram May 16 '13 at 21:11
    
@ek_ny At this moment in the code category is null. But if you remove the .ToList(), then (in a later line) set 'category' to something and do a ToList (or use in a foreach), the new value of 'category' is used. –  Hans Kesting May 17 '13 at 14:44

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