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My code below works but I'm concerned that its bad practice or may cause memory issues. But with my limited knowledge its the best way I've found. Can it be done any better?

Thanks

static void Main()
{
    // Directory of files.
    const string dir = @"C:\Test";

    // File names.
    string[] fns = Directory.GetFiles(dir);

    // Order by size.
    var sort = from fn in fns
               orderby new FileInfo(fn).Length descending
               select fn;

    // List files.
    foreach (string n in sort)
    {
        Console.Write(n);
        Console.Write(" ");
        FileInfo f = new FileInfo(n);
        long file = f.Length;
        Console.WriteLine(file);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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closed as off topic by Dan J, Fls'Zen, Niels Keurentjes, Jean-Bernard Pellerin, Jesse May 17 '13 at 3:08

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I doubt there's a problem with this, but you could use DirectoryInfo.GetFiles() instead if you want. –  Dominic P May 16 '13 at 20:56
    
This would be a better fit at codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Dan J May 16 '13 at 20:57
1  
If you are looping sort to get only file length why not store file length using your linq query and sort that and display length from sort collection –  rs. May 16 '13 at 20:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Instantiating the FileInfo instances isn't a problem. It's a managed object that doesn't implement IDisposable which means the garbage collector should be able to clean everything up nicely.

The issue I see is that you're creating two instances per file (one in your LINQ query, the other in your loop). Why not just modify your query so that you only need the instantiation a single time:

var sortedFiles = fns.Select(fn => new FileInfo(fn))
                     .OrderBy(f => f.Length);

foreach(var file in sortedFiles)
{
    Console.Write(file.Name);
    Console.Write(" ");
    Console.WriteLine(file.Length);
}
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Hey that works great. Can that LINQ expression be written without lambdas? They confuse the heck out of me. –  JimDel May 16 '13 at 21:17

I see no problem with the FileInfo instantiation you have. It looks like a managed object. let the garbage collector worry about it.

Now the FileStream object that you may or may not be using FileInfo with should be closed. a using statement will do the heavy lifting for you on that front

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I don't see a problem with your code but I would use DirectoryInfo("path"). it has a method GetFiles() which return FileInfo array. So you don't need to create it twice..

var sort = new DirectoryInfo(path).GetFiles().OrderBy(f => f.Length);
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  1. Create a DirectoryInfo from your directory path.
  2. Use it's GetFiles or EnumerateFiles method to get FileInfo objects directly.

Is this what you were looking for?

static void Main()
{
    // Directory of files.
    const string dir = @"C:\Test";

    // File names.
    var files = new DirectoryInfo(dir).EnumerateFiles();

    // Order by size.
    var sort = from file in files
               orderby file.Length descending
               select file;

    // List files.
    foreach (var file in sort)
    {
        Console.Write(file.FullName);
        Console.Write(" ");
        Console.WriteLine(file.Length);
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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