Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was looking at the code from this site, for a basic google app engine calculator. I am just as inexperienced with GAE as I am with HTML, so when I saw the code bellow I was a little confused. Mostly with the last line </html>""" % (result, buttons)). What is the % for and how does it relate result and buttons to the html code?

        result = ""
        try:
            result = f[operator](x, y)
        except ValueError:
            result = "Error: Incorrect Number"
        except ZeroDivisionError:
            result = "Error: Division by zero"
        except KeyError:
            pass
        # build HTML response
        buttons = "".join(["<input type='submit' name='operator' value='"
                           + o + "'>" for o in sorted(f.keys())])
        self.response.out.write("""<html>
            <body>
            <form action='/' method='get' autocomplete='off'> 
            <input type='text' name='x' value='%s'/><br/>
            <input type='text' name='y'/><br/> 
            %s 
            </form>
            </body>
            </html>""" % (result, buttons))
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The % is for formatting strings in Python. See a good explanation at Dive Into Python. In your example they are used to replace the '%s' characters with the values from variables.

Modifying your example:

A modified version your example, hardcoding values of result and buttons.

result = "THIS IS MY RESULT"
buttons = "AND MY BUTTON"
output = """
<html>
    <body>
        <form action='/' method='get' autocomplete='off'> 
            <input type='text' name='x' value='%s'/><br/>
            <input type='text' name='y'/><br/> 
            %s 
        </form>
    </body>
</html>
""" % (result, buttons)

print output

would yield:

<html>
    <body>
        <form action='/' method='get' autocomplete='off'> 
            <input type='text' name='x' value='THIS IS MY RESULT'/><br/>
            <input type='text' name='y'/><br/> 
            AND MY BUTTON 
        </form>
    </body>
</html>

In your example buttons holds more Html, and format strings make more sense in a context where the values would actually change, but the above should illustrate the basic principle.

A simpler example:

The code below:

result = "THIS IS MY RESULT"
buttons = "AND MY BUTTON"
print "%s ... %s!" % (result, buttons)

Would yield:

THIS IS MY RESULT ... AND MY BUTTON!

How it relates to App Engine:

Both examples above say print: this prints the output to "stdout"—your console.

In your original example, it says self.response.out.write, which is how you tell App Engine to write the text (which is Html) to your browser.

Concretely, if you change:

result = "THIS IS MY RESULT"
buttons = "AND MY BUTTON"
print "%s ... %s!" % (result, buttons)

to:

result = "THIS IS MY RESULT"
buttons = "AND MY BUTTON"
self.response.out.write("%s ... %s!" % (result, buttons))

the text will appear in your browser when you visit the page instead of on the console.

References:

Dive Into Python, also linked above is a great resource for learning Python. The whole book is good if you're new to Python. As are the Udacity courses.

The Python documentation on format strings is a good reference for format strings specifically.

The book "Using Google App Engine" is a great resource for learning Python, Html, and App Engine all at once. I can honestly recommend it, having read it myself. It's very accessible, but it is a few years old now.

Have fun!

share|improve this answer
    
Oh I see, so is it placing results in value and buttons in the one before form. Or is it putting them both in both locations because it's in a tuple? –  EasilyBaffled May 16 '13 at 22:30
1  
It's ordered. The first '%s' gets replaced by the first value (result's value), the second '%s' gets replaced by the second (buttons's value). I've modified the simple example to make it more clear; did it help? –  Ezra May 16 '13 at 22:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.