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As I understand it, C# has a syntax for writing arrays as such: { 1, 2, 3 }. Why is this invalid:

 x = { 1, 2, 3 }.GetLength(0);

while this is valid?

 int[] numbers = { 1, 2, 3 };
 x = numbers.GetLength(0);

Isn't the datatype of the expression { 1, 2, 3 } the same as numbers?

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You'll probably get a good answer, but you might find this useful msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb384062.aspx –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 16 '13 at 21:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The syntax you refer to is an object collection initializer. It is useful when initializing an instance of different types. It does not, in itself, create an instance of a given type.

For instance, you can use it to declare arrays:

int[] nums = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };

Lists:

List<int> nums = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };

Dictionary:

Dictionary<string, int> pairs = { { "One", 1 }, { "Two", 2 }, { "Three", 3 } };

You can still inline things to achieve your initial intention with a little more code:

new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.GetLength(0);
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No, that's not an object initializer. It's an array initializer. –  Jon Skeet May 16 '13 at 21:57
    
@JonSkeet - Isn't it technically a collection initializer? –  Justin Niessner May 16 '13 at 21:59
1  
No, not on its own - or rather, not in the context specified by the OP. I've added spec references to my answer. Collection initializers are part of object initializer expressions - this is simply an array initializer. (Bear in mind that collection initializers have been valid since C# 1, whereas object initializers and collection initializers were only added in C# 3.) –  Jon Skeet May 16 '13 at 22:01
    
Whoops, I meant "Bear in mind that array initializers [...]" of course :) –  Jon Skeet May 16 '13 at 22:20

Arrays are allowed anywhere - but you can only use that particular syntax (which is called an array initializer for creating them as part of a variable declaration - or as part of a larger expression called an array creation expression.

You can still create them though:

x = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }.GetLength(0);

So within that, new int[] { 1, 2, 3 } is the array creation expression, and the { 1, 2, 3 } part is the array initializer.

Array creation expressions are described in section 7.6.10.4 of the C# 5 spec, and array initializers are described in section 12.6.

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x = new[] { 1, 2, 3 }.GetLength(0); will get you what you want since {1, 2, 3} isn't on its own an array, but rather an array initializer. And GetLength() works with the former but not the latter.

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