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Why does it tend to get into an infinite loop if I use continue in a while loop, but works fine in a for loop?
The loop-counter increment i++ gets ignored in while loop if I use it after continue, but it works if it is in for loop.

If continue ignores subsequent statements, then why doesn't it ignore the third statement of the for loop then, which contains the counter increment i++? Isn't the third statement of for loop subsequent to continue as well and should be ignored, given the third statement of for loop is executed after the loop body?

while(i<10)   //causes infinite loop
{
    ...
    continue
    i++
    ...
}

for(i=0;i<10;i++)  //works fine and exits after 10 iterations
{
    ...
    continue
    ...
}
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Look at the output assembly and you'll see that for loops are not expanded how you think. –  Jesus Ramos May 16 '13 at 22:04
3  
Q: What happens if you put continue AFTER i++ in your "while" loop? Q: You understand that the initialization, increment, and condition are all part of the same construct in your "for" loop? That they're always executed, independent of what happens inside the loop? –  paulsm4 May 16 '13 at 22:05
    
@JesusRamos I haven't progressed yet to that level where assembly would make sense to me!! –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 22:05
1  
Thokchom, I suggest you find some better doco than what MS has provided :-) –  paxdiablo May 16 '13 at 22:18
2  
Thokchom, I think that's a typo, the conditional expression is the middle one, so I suspect what they meant was "... causes the third expression of the for statement to be evaluated". –  paxdiablo May 16 '13 at 22:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because continue goes back to the start of the loop. With for, the post-operation i++ is an integral part of the loop control and is executed before the loop body restarts.

With the while, the i++ is just another statement in the body of the loop (no different to something like a = b), skipped if you continue before you reach it.

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I'll be dead!!The Microsoft site has another contradictory description.It says A continue statement in a for statement causes the first expression of the for statement to be evaluated--msdn.microsoft.com/en-IN/library/0ceyyskb(v=vs.80).aspx Can you explain how come control goes to first statement of for loop? –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 22:08
    
@Thokchom, given that the link on that page leading to the for statement doesn't even describe the third section (the post-op), I'd be relying on something else to learn. –  paxdiablo May 16 '13 at 22:16
    
@Thokchom the description on that page is horribly broken. The link they provide tot he page describing the for statement explicitly is accurate. You may want to consider submitting a correction request. –  Nik Bougalis May 16 '13 at 22:36
    
@NikBougalis Can't believe a Microsoft site can be so unprofessional. –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 22:38
    
@Thokchom Relax, mistakes happen. Especially when you have to maintain a website with as much content as MSDN. –  Nik Bougalis May 16 '13 at 22:40

Your increment of i is after continue, so it never gets executed

while(i<10)   //causes infinite loop
{
.........
continue
i++
......
}
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The reason is because the continue statement will short-circuit the statements that follow it in the loop body. Since the way you wrote the while loop has the increment statement following the continue statement, it gets short-circuited. You can solve this by changing your while loop.

A lot of text books claim that:

for (i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
    /*...*/
}

is equivalent to:

i = 0;
while (i < N) {
    /*...*/
    ++i;
}

But, in reality, it is really like:

j = 0;
while ((i = j++) < N) {
    /*...*/
}

Or, to be a little more pedantic:

i = 0;
if (i < 10) do {
    /*...*/
} while (++i, (i < 10));

These are more equivalent, since now if the body of the while has a continue, the increment still occurs, just like in a for. The latter alternative only executes the increment after the iteration has completed, just like for (the former executes the increment before the iteration, deferring to save it in i until after the iteration).

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What's the difference?The book seem right. –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 22:28
    
@Thokchom: The difference is that the last formulation would allow your continue in the while loop to continue to increment. –  jxh May 16 '13 at 22:29
    
Oh..that will be handy when one wants the continue not to ignore the increment.Nice trick! +1 –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 22:32
    
@Thokchom: Thanks, I updated the answer to make my intention more clear. –  jxh May 16 '13 at 22:36

In any loop, continue moves execution back to the top of the loop, not executing any other instructions after the continue statement.

In this case, the for loop's definition is always executed (per standard C), whereas the i++; statement is NOT executed, because it comes AFTER the continue statement.

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Because the third part of the for is always executed.

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continue statement jumps the control to the end of the statements in current iteration of loop i.e. it skips the execution of the statements in the current iteration and moves to the next iteration of the loop.

With while loop, continue statement causes control to reach the end of statements (including increment statement), thus causing loop to continue forever.

With for loop, continue statement jumps the control to end of statement and excutes the increment statement (In for loop, increment statement is considered seperate from the statments written within the body of the loop).

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