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Can anyone explain how this code snippet works... The actual code itself is not relevant as it was from a short tutorial on using an MVP pattern for Android.

My main question is how this code structure works and whether this is an inner class, of sorts, or maybe a transaction.. I haven't seen a code structure like this in Java and I would like to undertsand it to learn from it as it seems efficient and minimal.

public void loadCustomer(int id) {
    (mCustomerModel.load(id)) {
        mCustomerView.setId(mCustomerModel.getId());
        mCustomerView.setFirstName(mCustomerModel.getFirstName());
        mCustomerView.setLastName(mCustomerModel.getLastName());
    }
}
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It's more of organisation style, you can perfectly skip the curly brackets. –  Alex May 16 '13 at 22:51
    
its the three method calls inside another method call that is confusing me... inside a set of brackets from the first method call. Am I being dumb... :-) –  leeb898 May 16 '13 at 22:52
1  
@leeb898 no ; after (mCustomerModel.load(id)) ? –  assylias May 16 '13 at 22:52
4  
@leeb898 IMO this does not compile - but I might be missing something. –  assylias May 16 '13 at 22:55
5  
You're not going crazy: The article has a typo (and should likely have an if statement prior to the load call.) With the if, the code just says "If the load in the model succeeds, update the UI." –  dlev May 16 '13 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

up vote -2 down vote accepted

This is straight forward, but certainly appears slightly unusual. The round brackets surrounding mCustomerModel.load(id) are superfluous, and in this case the curly braces around the next three lines are also superfluous. In a another case, if a local variable had been declared within that block, it's scope would be limited to that block only. The code below is equivalent:

public void loadCustomer(int id) {
    mCustomerModel.load(id);
    mCustomerView.setId(mCustomerModel.getId());
    mCustomerView.setFirstName(mCustomerModel.getFirstName());
    mCustomerView.setLastName(mCustomerModel.getLastName());

}

EDIT: Missed the intention that the line within round brackets should be an if statement. That being the case, the code is fairly self explanatory once "if" has been added.

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3  
This does not compile (missing ;) –  assylias May 16 '13 at 22:56
    
If you feel like you misinterpreted the question, you can simply delete your answer (link below the answer). –  assylias May 16 '13 at 23:07
    
@Monty Goodepuppee I understand now, with the If statement makes normal sense and without it is just organisational structure to the the method calls. –  leeb898 May 16 '13 at 23:09
    
Thanks for the tip @assylias –  Monty Goodepuppee May 16 '13 at 23:24

EDIT: There should be an if statement before (mCustomerModel.load(id)), and that is what my answer assumes.

public void loadCustomer(int id) {
    (mCustomerModel.load(id)) {

mCustomerModel.load(id) probably checks if a customer id is valid, and if it is, prepares customer data to be accessed/modified.

        mCustomerView.setId(mCustomerModel.getId());

get the customer's id, and set it in the mCustomerView, which is probably a GUI element that displays the data.

        mCustomerView.setFirstName(mCustomerModel.getFirstName());
        mCustomerView.setLastName(mCustomerModel.getLastName());

do the same thing for the customer's first and last name (display it in the GUI)

    }
}
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2  
There's no if statement. –  dlev May 16 '13 at 22:55
    
@dlev, wow. how did I miss that? –  BLuFeNiX May 16 '13 at 22:56
    
To be fair, I think there should be an if statement, and the rest of your explanation is correct. –  dlev May 16 '13 at 23:00
    
I understand what the code is doing, my query is regarding the actual structure of the code snippet, to understand the syntax of having the three method calls inside the curly braces of the previous method call. –  leeb898 May 16 '13 at 23:05

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