Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem of an automatic x-axis rescaling happening when I do the following:

  1. plot column 1
  2. plot column 1 where column 2 is notnull, but with different style.

The second plot keeps rescaling the x-axis for me, losing the overview of the full column 1 plot. I have detailed what happened in this notebook: http://nbviewer.ipython.org/5596249

Is there a way to keep the x-axis from rescaling at the 2nd plot? I have tried x_compat=True but that does not seem to do anything for me.

Versions: pd: 0.11.0, MPL: 1.2.0

[Edit] Here's the ipython output:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: pd.__version__
Out[2]: '0.12.0.dev-f354548'

In [3]: dr = pd.date_range('now', periods=10)

In [4]: df = pd.DataFrame(randn(10,2), index=dr)

In [5]: df
Out[5]:
                            0         1
2013-05-17 17:55:43 -0.440814  0.246620
2013-05-18 17:55:43 -0.732045 -0.896267
2013-05-19 17:55:43  1.131248  1.213163
2013-05-20 17:55:43  0.478372  0.624647
2013-05-21 17:55:43  1.425489  0.396689
2013-05-22 17:55:43 -0.881991  0.322917
2013-05-23 17:55:43 -1.047584  0.154040
2013-05-24 17:55:43 -0.327258  0.944843
2013-05-25 17:55:43 -0.013396  1.045499
2013-05-26 17:55:43 -0.035380 -0.611224

In [6]: df[1][:5]=nan

In [7]: df
Out[7]:
                            0         1
2013-05-17 17:55:43 -0.440814       NaN
2013-05-18 17:55:43 -0.732045       NaN
2013-05-19 17:55:43  1.131248       NaN
2013-05-20 17:55:43  0.478372       NaN
2013-05-21 17:55:43  1.425489       NaN
2013-05-22 17:55:43 -0.881991  0.322917
2013-05-23 17:55:43 -1.047584  0.154040
2013-05-24 17:55:43 -0.327258  0.944843
2013-05-25 17:55:43 -0.013396  1.045499
2013-05-26 17:55:43 -0.035380 -0.611224

In [8]: df[0].plot()
Out[8]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x116dbff50>

In [9]: df[1].plot()
Out[9]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x116dbff50>

In [10]: # the above did not rescale the x-axis, even so the plottable range of [1] is smaller

In [11]: clf()

In [12]: df['selector'] = df[1].notnull()

In [13]: df
Out[13]:
                            0         1 selector
2013-05-17 17:55:43 -0.440814       NaN    False
2013-05-18 17:55:43 -0.732045       NaN    False
2013-05-19 17:55:43  1.131248       NaN    False
2013-05-20 17:55:43  0.478372       NaN    False
2013-05-21 17:55:43  1.425489       NaN    False
2013-05-22 17:55:43 -0.881991  0.322917     True
2013-05-23 17:55:43 -1.047584  0.154040     True
2013-05-24 17:55:43 -0.327258  0.944843     True
2013-05-25 17:55:43 -0.013396  1.045499     True
2013-05-26 17:55:43 -0.035380 -0.611224     True

In [14]: df[0].plot()
Out[14]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x111288250>

In [15]: df[df.selector][0].plot(style='r*', markersize=5)
Out[15]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x111288250>

In [16]: # the above rescaled the x-axis

and here's just the code:

import pandas as pd

pd.__version__
dr = pd.date_range('now',periods=10)
df = pd.DataFrame(randn(10,2),index=dr)
df[1][:5]=nan

# This way it works:

df[0].plot()

df[1].plot()


df['selector'] = df[1].notnull()
df[0].plot()

# This way the x-axis is being rescaled. How can I fix it at the previous setting?

df[df.selector][0].plot(style='r*')
share|improve this question
    
One quick workaround might be to reverse the order of plotting. –  askewchan May 17 '13 at 1:37
    
Yes, that's true. But of course I don't want to go on a planning spree in which order I have to plot things.. As it so happens, I have to emphasize multiple things in the data for being special for separate reasons. –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 4:44
1  
I would prefer to have the code in your question, as one can simply copy and paste it. –  bmu May 17 '13 at 6:47
    
You can also look at the notebook: nbviewer.ipython.org/5596249 –  joris May 17 '13 at 7:17
    
I will add it, but then it won't have the graphics showing the problem, that's why I went for the notebook. –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 17:51

1 Answer 1

Create your fig and axes object explicitly so you can control them better. In this case, use the autoscale method of the axes object

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas

# [make a dataframe called df]
fig, ax = plt.subplots()

df['A'].plot(ax=ax)
ax.autoscale(enable=False)
df['B'].plot(ax=ax)
share|improve this answer
    
your example is no good, because the pandas plotting interface does plot your case fine and without auto-scaling, even so the range of column B is smaller than A's. –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 17:50
    
What I am trying to say is, that for just plotting column ['B'] one does not need that extra control. But thanks for the solution, it works. –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 18:15
    
well yeah. It was a simplified example since I didn't have your code at the time. –  Paul H May 17 '13 at 18:16
    
so then the question remains to the pandas guys, why the autoscale does not happen for just plotting the second column, but happens plotting with a boolean selector. Possibly something to do with the fact that a boolean selector returns a copy and not a view? –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 18:16
    
oh! when testing your code, I forgot to set half of column B to nan. So your solution does NOT work. Not when using the boolean selector, even when using the ax=ax option. –  K.-Michael Aye May 17 '13 at 18:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.