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Total novice here trying to learn myself java with tools online. Right now Im clearly doing something wrong as I cant figure out how to get a separate class file to return a random int. The random code is fine, its just I don't know how to actually get it to return properly! Probably seems like java 101 to a lot of you but im lost. lol

I want them in seperate class files as an excersize in how to not put everything in one file. This workd fine if I just put it in one class, but thats not what I want to practice here. Thanks for any help!

Class file 1:

package whatsthis;

import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Noidea{

    private static Scanner user_input;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Git is awesome");

        Scanner user_input = new Scanner(System.in);
        randnum rn = new randnum();
        System.out.println("RANDOM NUM: " +rn);

        System.out.println("What is your name?");
        String first_name;
        first_name = user_input.next();
        System.out.println("Hello, "+first_name);

        int health = 100;

        while( health>0 )
        {   
            //System.out.println(rndNum);
            //System.out.println(rndNum);

            System.out.println(health);
            System.out.println("Attack? Y/N");
            String attack;
            attack = user_input.next();

            if (attack.equals("Y")){
                System.out.println("KILL!");
                System.out.println("You've done " + rn + " damage!");
                //health = health - rn;
                System.out.println(health);

            } else {
                System.out.println("cower..");
            }
        }
    }   
}

Class file 2:

package whatsthis;

import java.util.Random;

public class randnum
{
    public int randnum()
    {
        int Low = 10;                               //Used for lowened number in random
        int High = 15;                              //Used for highend number in random
        Random rndGen = new Random();               //Declare a new 'random' object
        int rn = rndGen.nextInt(High-Low) + Low;    //Proper random between two numbers (high and low)

        return rn;
    }
}

Instead of the number im looking for, it returns whatsthis.randnum@2d09b23b Why ios this and how do I fix it? Sorry again if this is painfully simple.

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1  
I would change public int randnum() to public static int getrand() and then call it using int rn = randnum.getrand(). Don't use the same name for a class and a method within that class, unless the method is a constructor. –  jarmod May 17 '13 at 1:03
1  
Hello Paul, good question you got there. Very specific. I just want to comment on your 'randnum' class. When you are creating a class, every first letter of the class should be in Uppercase. In your case, it should be RandNum. I hope this help in your learning. Good luck! –  Michael Ardan May 17 '13 at 1:16
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do this:

randnum rn = new randnum();
int i = rn.randnum();

Also, read about Code Conventions for the Java Programming Language.

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Ahh thank you! I had no idea it was done like that. Man this is confusing at first when i miss certain things like that. Worked perfect this time! –  Paul Duncan May 17 '13 at 1:04
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You're almost there - to call a method of Class X from any Class Y, you just need to create an instance of Class X in Class Y (as you've already done by creating a randnum object in your NoIdea class), then you can call methods on it as follows:

int num = rn.randnum();
//do something with num

For the record, it as an accepted Java convention to capitalize the names of classes...

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1  
He has the instance already. –  Eng.Fouad May 17 '13 at 1:02
1  
Indeed he does, didn't look carefully enough :) –  drewmore May 17 '13 at 1:05
    
Thanks! Appreciated the input –  Paul Duncan May 17 '13 at 1:45
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In order to get the random number, you would have to call the randnum method in the randnum class via int i = rn.randnum();.

If you want to create a random number from the beginning on that is accessible at any time, you can create an int value that can be called outside of the class.

public class randnum
{
    public int number;

    public randnum() {
        int Low = 10;
        int High = 15;
        Random rndGen = new Random();

        //initialize the number!
        number = rndGen.nextInt(High-Low) + Low;
    }

    public int getNumber() {
        return number;
    }
}

The constructor (public randnum() {...) is called as soon as a the object is initialized (with new randnum();). So randnum number = new randnum(); creates a new object that contains a random number that can be accessed either by saying number.number; or number.getNumber();.

If you don't want to create an extra object for that, just because it's too circuitous to create an extra object to get a random number, just make the method static:

public static int randnum() {
    int Low = 10;
    int High = 15;
    Random rndGen = new Random();
    int number = rndGen.nextInt(High-Low) + Low;

    return number;
}

The static keyword makes the method available everywhere without even having to create an extra object of it. So this time, you'd be able to just say int number = randnum.randnum();.

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1  
Very informative. Thank you. Ill be bookmarking this page for further referance –  Paul Duncan May 17 '13 at 1:46
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You probably do not want to use the object randnum, instead you just want to access the method "randnum()". I would forget about objects (i.e. using the "new" keyword) and make the method static, which means there is just one instance of it (if you don't know about objects yet, don't worry about this. Basically, static means you don't have to use "new", but it also means you can't have two different copies of it (like you wanted two different weapons doing different damage, so you could reuse randnum() with different Low and High values, and those values would be bounded to the two copies.))

`public static int randnum()
    {
        int Low = 10;                               //Used for lowened number in random
        int High = 15;                              //Used for highend number in random
        Random rndGen = new Random();               //Declare a new 'random' object
        int rn = rndGen.nextInt(High-Low) + Low;    //Proper random between two numbers (high and low)

        return rn;
    }`

This way you can just be like int rn = randnum.randnum(). This makes things less convoluted, since Also, you usually don't call methods inside a class the same name as the class, unless it's a constructor, which is something special for objects. One more thing, most methods are named with verbs, like getRandNum(), since methods are actions.

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I did a litte change in your code. Class names should be capitalized using upper camel case. Randnum.java

package whatsthis;

import java.util.Random;

public class Randnum
{
    public int randnum()
    {
        int Low = 10;                               //Used for lowened number in random
        int High = 15;                              //Used for highend number in random
        Random rndGen = new Random();               //Declare a new 'random' object
        int rn = rndGen.nextInt(High-Low) + Low;    //Proper random between two numbers  (high and low)

        return rn;
    }
}

Noidea.java

package whatsthis;

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Noidea{

private static Scanner user_input;

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    System.out.println("Git is awesome");

    Scanner user_input = new Scanner(System.in);
    int rn = new Randnum().randnum();
    System.out.println("RANDOM NUM: " +rn);

    System.out.println("What is your name?");
    String first_name;
    first_name = user_input.next();
    System.out.println("Hello, "+first_name);

    int health = 100;

    while( health>0 )
    {   
        //System.out.println(rndNum);
        //System.out.println(rndNum);

        System.out.println(health);
        System.out.println("Attack? Y/N");
        String attack;
        attack = user_input.next();

        if (attack.equals("Y")){
            System.out.println("KILL!");
            System.out.println("You've done " + rn + " damage!");
            health = health - rn;
            System.out.println(health);

        } else {
            System.out.println("cower..");
        }
    }
}   
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Since Randnum should be using the Random many times, make it an instance variable: private Random rndGen = new Random(); Also, don't do so much work in main. Create an instance of Noidea in main, and have that do the work. You can take much of the logic and move move it to shorter methods, which is better for testing. –  Eric Jablow May 17 '13 at 1:37
    
Gotcha. Thats what I'm going for, splitting things out and out of main into their own parts for easy management, just got stuck here :) –  Paul Duncan May 17 '13 at 1:48
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