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What is the difference of inheritance definition of the two ways below

function Rectangle(w,h){
   this.width=w;
   this.height.h;
   this.area=function(){return this.width*this.height;}
}

and

function Rectangle(w,h){
   this.width=w;
   this.height.h;

}
Rectangle.prototype.area=function(){return this.width*this.height;} 

I saw somebody said the first way is inefficient of use regular properties for methods that are intended to be shared by all objects of the same class.

Welcome any comment

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marked as duplicate by Ja͢ck, Sebas, bfavaretto, Mark Reed, Evan Trimboli May 17 '13 at 2:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
You should put the methods that are shared between instances in the prototype otherwise you're cloning the methods on every instance. –  elclanrs May 17 '13 at 1:43
    
Well, that somebody was right :) –  Ja͢ck May 17 '13 at 1:47
1  
Wow, not many duplicates are that exact. Where's that code from? (EDIT: nevermind, figured it out from the other question) –  bfavaretto May 17 '13 at 1:59
    
Its quite good. –  JDeveloper May 17 '13 at 2:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first way, every time you construct a new Rectangle, you also create a new anonymous function and assign it to this.area. The second way is more efficient if you are going to be constructing more than one Rectangle, because the anonymous function is still only created once, and all Rectangles have access to it, via their prototype.

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Not sure the term "anonymous function" is useful here. The statement is an assignment of a FunctionExpression to an object property. The formal name is optional (and in this case not useful), but it's not really "anonymous". –  RobG May 17 '13 at 2:15

The first way, you could use w and h directly inside the area function, equals to use them as private variable.

function Rec(w,h) {
    this.setW=function(newW){
        w=newW;
    }
    this.area=function(){
        return w*h;
    }
}

var rec=new Rec(5,6);

you cannot do alert(rec.w), or rec.w=5. since there is no this.w inside the class. but you can do

rec.setW(2);   
alert(rec.area());

this will alert 12.

http://jsfiddle.net/vanessachem/Hmyyc/ like this. w and h could be treat private variable. they could only be reset via a setter function inside the class.

It is inefficient when you need to create multiple instance. If you just want to create singleton, the first one is easy to manage.

The advantage of the second one is that you could put prototype function inside different file. It is good for multiple instances. However, you cannot treat w and h as private variable. You can't use w or h directly in the area function.

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1  
In both ways, w and h are not private. –  Ja͢ck May 17 '13 at 1:46
1  
For private variable that I understand, function inside the class could use variable like w or h, while the object instance can't access w or h. In way1, function inside the class could use w and h( not width and height). But in way2, function inside the class could not access w and h. –  Linghua Jin May 17 '13 at 1:52
1  
Rectangle(w,h){this.area=function(){return w*h;}} then you cannot access w or h when you create an instance, but for the second one, when you create an instance, you can access w and h via width and height... –  Linghua Jin May 17 '13 at 2:16
1  
jsfiddle.net/vanessachem/Hmyyc You could change the value via a setter function. but you cannot directly modify it via the instance. –  Linghua Jin May 17 '13 at 2:39
1  
Since there is no this.w or this.h inside class, w and h will always be the current value when you create a instance. –  Linghua Jin May 17 '13 at 2:40

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