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I was trying to follow example codes to simply display a rectangle on a black background, but it didn't seem to be displaying. What I did was

    private static void initGL(){
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    glLoadIdentity(); 
    glOrtho(0,Display.getWidth(),0,Display.getHeight(),-1,1);
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

    glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST); //2D mode

    glColor3f(0.5f, 0.0f, 1.0f); 
    glBegin(GL_QUADS); 
        glVertex2f(-0.75, 0.75);
        glVertex2f(-0.75, -0.75);
        glVertex2f(0.75, -0.75);
        glVertex2f(0.75, 0.75);
    glEnd();
}

It doesn't display anything on the screen except for a black background. Does anyone know what I might have done wrong? I'm using lwjgl in eclipse.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First things first: You only have to run the whole

glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity(); 
glOrtho(0,Display.getWidth(),0,Display.getHeight(),-1,1);
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);

thing once during your program, probably shortly after you run Display.create().

Also, you're tessellating using the wrong vertices. You wrote

glVertex2f(-0.75, 0.75);
glVertex2f(-0.75, -0.75);
glVertex2f(0.75, -0.75);
glVertex2f(0.75, 0.75); 

which means draw a rectangle from (-0.75, -0.75) pixels to (0.75, 0.75) pixels. This is too small to be noticed. My guess is you assumed glVertex2f deals with fractions of the display width. It does not. glVertex2f deals with actual coordinates, it just allows fractional pixels, unlike glVertex2i (this is useful believe it or not, it helps with smoother animations). Something like

glVertex2f(100F, 100F);

places a vertex at (100, 100), and is effectively equivalent to

glVertex2i(100, 100);

Also, remember that negative pixels will be rendered off the screen, because OpenGL's origin of the coordinate system, (0, 0), is in the lower left and behaves like the first quadrant from the coordinate system in math class, not like the traditional computer coordinate system with (0, 0) in the upper left.

As for the the black background, LWJGL's Display has a black background by default, so it's recommended to draw a quad with your background color that covers the entire display width and height. One quad won't really affect your performance.

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1  
Note that glVertex doesn't always map directly to pixels, it only does when you setup your orthographic coordinate system to be equal to the display size. If OP would have used an identity ortho matrix instead of one derived from screen width/height, then his -.75 to .75 square would have filled the middle 50% of the screen as expected. –  Tim May 17 '13 at 3:23
1  
"You only have to run the whole thing once during your program" - No, that's a common misconception (while it works in his case and many other simple ones it isn't nearly as good practice as you might think). –  Christian Rau May 17 '13 at 14:13
    
thanks so much everyone! problem fixed –  nemesis May 18 '13 at 4:59

glVertex2f uses same size units as your glOrtho so unless your display width and height are in units of ones, like 10 or less, you may not see anything!

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1  
While this isn't as explanative as Leo's answer, it draws a much better connection between the values in glVertex and the glOrtho call. –  Christian Rau May 17 '13 at 14:18

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