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I have two seperate JFrames but when i click the X in the topright of one, it will exit out of the other also. I have an "exit" button near the bottom to do setVisible(false), but i still have the tendency to use the x button. How would i make it so that it doesnt cancel out of the entire project?

Also, how would i make it so that the second JFrame locks out of the other JFrame untill the second JFrame is closed, like how a popup message works

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2 Answers 2

Don't give your GUI two JFrames. The GUI ideally should have only one GUI. If a separate window is required, then make it a dialog such as a JDialog, and this won't happen.

Also, how would i make it so that the second JFrame locks out of the other JFrame untill the second JFrame is closed, like how a popup message works

You are perfectly describing the behavior of a modal JDialog or JOptionPane. Just use 'em.

Later we'll chat about using CardLayouts to swap views in a single GUI.


Edit, you state:

Im using Netbeans form editor to create them faster but I only see JFrame and JPanel. Can I edit them in Netbeans? I'd rather not do them through scratch Java

You've touched on another zealous belief of mine, that this is yet another reason not to use a code generator when learning a library as one can get too tied into the code generator, that it prevents one from learning the library. I strongly advise you to put aside your code-generation tool and create by hand, referring to the tutorials and API. Then later when you get more familiar with the library, sure use the tool. By the way, an answer to your direct question here is to gear your GUI's to create JPanels, and then use these JPanels where and how you want them -- in JFrames, or JDialogs, or JOptionPanes, or swapped in CardLayouts, or JTabbedPanes or nested in other JPanels,... etc...

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1  
+1 I totally agree. –  Eng.Fouad May 17 '13 at 2:30
    
@Eng.Fouad: thanks! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 17 '13 at 2:31
    
Im using Netbeans form editor to create them faster but I only see JFrame and JPanel. Can I edit them in Netbeans? I'd rather not do them through scratch Java –  Arhowk May 17 '13 at 2:31
    
I might've answered my own question, I can just swap the layout to null than copy the generated code into a JDialog –  Arhowk May 17 '13 at 2:34
    
@Arhowk: please see edit, and please don't use null layouts almost ever. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 17 '13 at 2:35

You should be using a modal JDialog, not a second JFrame, because JDialogs provide certain functionality such as not adding another window bar to the taskbar, and automatically setting focus when the parent JFrame receives focus. Modal JDialogs prevent user input to the JFrame while it's open, useful for an "Are you sure you want to exit?" dialog, for example.

As for one JFrame exiting the other, you probably have their default close operation set to EXIT_ON_CLOSE. If you do this:

jframe.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DO_NOTHING_ON_CLOSE);
jframe.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter(){
    public void windowClosing(WindowEvent we){
        handleUserWantsToCloseWindow();
    }
});

Then you can control what happens when the user wants to close, such as popping up a "Save Changes?" modal JDialog or "Are you sure you want to quit?" modal JDialog. Note that you have to manually dispose of the JFrame if you use this method.

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