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I recently faced an interview question on what's the hidden problem with the following code. I was unable to detect it .Can anyone help?

#include<stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char buff[10];
    memset(buff,0,sizeof(buff));

    gets(buff);

    printf("\n The buffer entered is [%s]\n",buff);

    return 0;
}
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3  
memset needs string.h – Bill May 17 '13 at 2:56
    
"Never use gets(). Because it is impossible to tell without knowing the data in advance how many characters gets() will read, and because gets() will continue to store characters past the end of the buffer, it is extremely dangerous to use. It has been used to break computer security. Use fgets() instead." - gets man page – Fred Larson May 17 '13 at 2:56
    
Your code works....add fflush(stdin) and string.h ideone.com/SDxb3f – Bill May 17 '13 at 2:58
2  
@DouglasB.Staple: No, sizeof on an array will return the size of the array. – Fred Larson May 17 '13 at 2:58
3  
@Bill fflush() is not defined for input streams. Never use fflush(stdin), it's a bug, and Undefined Behavior. – This isn't my real name May 17 '13 at 3:19
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The function gets accepts a string from stdin and does not check the capacity of the buffer.This may result in buffer overflow. The standard function fgets() can be used here.

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gets could return much more than 10 characters.

gets is really problematic because you can't tell it to only fill 'buff' up to a length of 10.

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check the Bugs Section of this manual which says

   Never use gets().  Because it is impossible to tell without knowing
   the data in advance how many characters gets() will read, and because
   gets() will continue to store characters past the end of the buffer,
   it is extremely dangerous to use.  It has been used to break computer
   security.  Use fgets() instead.

   It is not advisable to mix calls to input functions from the stdio
   library with low-level calls to read(2) for the file descriptor
   associated with the input stream; the results will be undefined and
   very probably not what you want.
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It is always recommended to use fgets()/ scanf() over gets().

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by using the function gets() you don't have the option to limit the user to a certian text length, which may cause a buffer overflow exception. That is why you should not use it.

Try to use fgets() instead: fgets(buff, MAX_LENGTH_ stdin);

Good luck!

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