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So I have a problem.

I am wanting to do something similar to this, where I call out a value, and it prints out the keys associated with that value. And I can even get it working:

def test(pet): 
  dic = {'Dog': ['der Hund', 'der Katze'] , 'Cat' : ['der Katze'] , 'Bird': ['der Vogel']}
  items = dic.items()
  key = dic.keys()
  values = dic.values()
  for x, y in items:
      for item in y: 
          if item == pet:
              print x

However, when I incorporate this same code format into a larger program it stops working:

def movie(movie):
  file = open('/Users/Danrex/Desktop/Text.txt' , 'rt')
  read = file.read()
  list = read.split('\n')

  actorList=[]
  for item in list:
  actorList = actorList + [item.split(',')]

  actorDict = dict()
  for item in actorList:
    if item[0] in actorDict:
      actorDict[item[0]].append(item[1])
    else:
      actorDict[item[0]] = [item[1]]

  items = actorDict.items()
  for x, y in items:
      for item in y: 
          if item == movie:
              print x

I have print(ed) out actorDict, items, x, y, and item and they all seem to follow the same format as the previous code so I can't figure out why this isn't working! So confused. And, please, when you explain it to me do it as if I am a complete idiot, which I probably am.

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Can you please paste the Text.txt on Pastebin and share the link? And a test example too. Just to see what you pass into the function and what you expect. –  Sukrit Kalra May 17 '13 at 3:51
    
Your indentation is incorrect - make sure that your actorList gets filled. –  Andrey Sobolev May 17 '13 at 3:54
    
^ Most probably an error while pasting. Python would throw up an error if this was being run in the interpreter. –  Sukrit Kalra May 17 '13 at 4:07
    
This is very inefficient code, anyway. Why don't you put movies as keys? That's the sort of thing dictionaries are for. Have two dictionaries if you need to map both ways. Use a database if it's too big to fit in memory. –  tripleee May 17 '13 at 4:29
    
It's ok what was wrong was there was a space before the movies and so I needed to .strip() that. Thank you all for your help. –  Danrex May 17 '13 at 4:43

1 Answer 1

Cleaning up the code with some more idiomatic Python will sometimes clarify things. This is how I would write it in Python 2.7:

from collections import defaultdict

def movie(movie):
    actorDict = defaultdict(list)
    movie_info_filename = '/Users/Danrex/Desktop/Text.txt'
    with open(movie_info_filename, 'rt') as fin:
        for line_item in fin:
            split_items = line_item.split(',')
            actorDict[split_items[0]].append(split_items[1])

    for actor, actor_info in actorDict.items():
        for info_item in actor_info: 
            if info_item == movie:
                print actor

In this case, what mostly boiled out were temporary objects created for making the actorDict. defaultdict creates a dictionary-like object that allows one to specify a function to generate the default value for a key that isn't currently present. See the collections documentation for more info.

What it looks like you're trying to do is print out some actor value for each time they are listed with a particular movie in your text file.

If you're going to check more than one movie, make the actorDict once and reference your movies against that existing actorDict. This will save you trips to disk.

from collections import defaultdict

def make_actor_dict():
    actorDict = defaultdict(list)
    movie_info_filename = '/Users/Danrex/Desktop/Text.txt'
    with open(movie_info_filename, 'rt') as fin:
        for line_item in fin:
            split_items = line_item.split(',')
            actorDict[split_items[0]].append(split_items[1])

def movie(movie, actorDict):
    for actor, actor_info in actorDict.items():
        for info_item in actor_info: 
            if info_item == movie:
                print actor

def main():
    actorDict = make_actor_dict()
    movie('Star Wars', actorDict)
    movie('Indiana Jones', actorDict)

If you only care that the actor was in that movie, you don't have to iterate through the movie list manually, you can just check that movie is in actor_info:

def movie(movie, actorDict):
    for actor in actorDict:
        if movie in actorDict[actor]:
            print actor

Of course, you already figure out that the problem was the movie name not being an exact match to the text you read from the file. If you want to allow less-than-exact matches, you should consider normalizing your movie string and your data strings from the file. The string methods strip() and lower() can be really helpful there.

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