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I have a std::vector of unique_ptrs and I'm happy to have them manage the life cycle of those objects.

However I require storing other pointers to those objects for convenience. I know that once unique_ptr removes something, those other pointers will dangle. But I'm more concerned about the validity of those pointers before and after unique_ptr gets them.

I do not always create via new within the unique_ptr itself, for example I might pass new Something as a function parameter in which case the unique_ptr is using move on that pointer into itself inside the function.

But I might also new Something before I pass it into a function that then assigned it a unique_ptr.

Once an object is assigned to a unique_ptr I can get a pointer to it via get(). But can I always assume that this get() pointer points to the same place as the pointer initially obtained via new if the original pointer was created before the assignment to a unique_ptr ?

My assumption is Yes, and that even if the vector resizes and reallocates, the unique_ptr as well as any other pointers to the objects in memory remain the same.

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More computery code, less humany text. :) –  GManNickG May 17 '13 at 3:21
    
What I understood is that you're sharing pointers. Seems like it should better be done with std::shared_ptr. –  Mark Garcia May 17 '13 at 3:22
    
@MarkGarcia valid point, but I'm still curious about how a normal C-style pointer interacts in this way with the std smart pointers –  OpenLearner May 17 '13 at 3:23
    
unique_ptr doesn't change the pointer it owns. As others have mentioned. the description of what you want to do sounds like it pretty much may defeat the purpose of having a unique_ptr to the object. –  Michael Burr May 17 '13 at 3:26
    
@MarkGarcia There is a difference between having more than one pointer to an object and having more than one owning pointer. If it made no sense to have a normal non-owning pointer, then unique_ptr wouldn't have a get() function. –  OpenLearner May 17 '13 at 12:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, a std::unique_ptr<T> holds a pointer to T, and it will not alter the value between initialization and later retrieval with get()

A common use of a unique_ptr is to assign one "parent" object ownership of a dynamically-allocated "subobject", in a similiar same way as:

struct A
{
    B b;
}

int main()
{
    A a = ...;
    B* p = &a.b;
}

In the above b is a true subobject of A.

Compare this to:

struct A
{
    unique_ptr<B> b = new B(...);
}

int main()
{
    A a = ...;
    B* p = a.b.get();
}

In the above A and (*b) have a similar relationship to the first example, except here the B object is allocated on the heap. In both cases the destructor of A will destroy the "subobject". This "on heap" subobject structure may be preferable in some cases, for example because B is a polymorphic base type, or to make B an optional/nullable subobject of A.

The advantage of using unique_ptr over a raw pointer to manage this ownership relationship is that it will automatically destroy it in As destructor, and it will automatically move construct and move assign it as part of A.

As usual, in both cases, you must be careful that the lifetime of any raw pointers to the subobject are enclosed by the lifetime of the owning object.

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Yes, you are correct, because unique_ptr does not copy the object; therefore, it has to point to the same address. However, once you give a pointer to a unique_ptr to own, you should not use that raw pointer any more, because the unique_ptr could be destroyed and deallocate the memory, and turn your raw pointer into a dangling pointer. Perhaps shared_ptr would be better for your situation.

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1  
-1: unique_ptr would be useless if you could not have other non-owning pointers or references to it's contents. –  Puppy May 17 '13 at 3:36
    
@DeadMG doesn't the name imply that it's supposed to be the only pointer to something? Or does the unique part mean it's just the only owning pointer to something? It goes without saying of course that you can use pointers however you want as long as you're sure the unique_ptr isn't destroyed (removed from the vector in this case), but I didn't get the impression that that's what this question was about. –  Seth Carnegie May 17 '13 at 3:45
1  
@SethCarnegie: It was the first sentence of the OP's second paragraph. How'd you miss that? –  Nicol Bolas May 17 '13 at 3:47
    
@NicolBolas miss what? I said what the OP can do, what I think he shouldn't do, and what I think he should do. –  Seth Carnegie May 17 '13 at 3:49
    
@SethCarnegie: You said "I didn't get the impression that that's what this question was about." The first sentence of the second paragraph is "However I require storing other pointers to those objects for convenience." "other pointers" being the key phrase here. –  Nicol Bolas May 17 '13 at 4:15

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