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I've been trying for a couple weeks to figure this out, but I'm totally stumped.

I have an array that represents item_id's: [2, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3].

I have another array that represents how many times each item shows up: [1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 5] .

I want to check that all items have been completed so I want to create an array that has the total number of item_id's in it. I will compare that array against a completed items array that will be created as the user completes each item, so, from the example above, the array I'm trying to create is:

[2, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]

EDIT:

I'm building a workout app, so a user has a workout which has many exercises. Each exercise has one or more sets associated with it. The user completes an exercise when he has completed every set for that exercise, and completes a workout when he completes all exercises for that workout. In this question I'm trying to determine when a user has finished a workout.

EDIT 2:

I wish I could award multiple right answers! Thanks everyone!

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Would you mind telling us a bit more about the specific domain? What exactly is being completed? –  depa May 17 '13 at 3:36
    
Why are your item_id's repeating in the first array? How can we distinguish one two from the other? This is for the case when there are 0, 2's and the arrays might look like this [2,2,2,3,4,5] [2,0,1,1,1,1] [2,3,4,5]? –  Sanchit May 17 '13 at 3:39
    
@depa Sure! I was just trying to keep things simple. I updated the question with more information about what I'm doing with the app. –  Arel May 17 '13 at 3:42
    
@Sanchit there are situations where a workout could have an exercise more than once. An exercise will never have 0 sets, so that situation will never exist. –  Arel May 17 '13 at 3:44
    
Since no two numbers repeat in array1. Convert the 3rd array into a form of the 2nd array then compare with the 2nd array. –  Sanchit May 17 '13 at 3:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
item_ids = [2, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3]
counts = [1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 5]
item_ids.zip(counts).map{|item_id,count| [item_id]*count}.flatten
 => [2, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]

What's going on here? Let's look at it step by step.

zip takes two arrays and "zips" them together element-by-element. I did this to create an array of item_id, count pairs.

item_ids.zip(counts)
 => [[2, 1], [4, 1], [5, 3], [6, 3], [2, 2], [3, 5]]

map takes each element of an array and executes a block. In this case, I'm using the * operator to expand each item_id into an array of count elements.

[1]*3 => [1, 1, 1]
[[2, 1], [4, 1], [5, 3], [6, 3], [2, 2], [3, 5]].map{|item_id,count| [item_id]*count}
 => [[2], [4], [5, 5, 5], [6, 6, 6], [2, 2], [3, 3, 3, 3, 3]]

Finally, flatten takes an array of arrays and "flattens" it down into a 1-dimensional array.

[[2], [4], [5, 5, 5], [6, 6, 6], [2, 2], [3, 3, 3, 3, 3]].flatten
 => [2, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]
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+1 for breaking it down for the OP. –  the Tin Man May 17 '13 at 3:59
    
Just to point out to the OP, this answer is essentially the same as @Speransky Danil's answer, but his was submitted first. –  the Tin Man May 17 '13 at 4:08
    
Thanks @theTinMan. I awarded this answer because it does such a great job explaining why it's done this way. I wish I could award both answers. –  Arel May 17 '13 at 4:14
    
Thanks! I also just realized this could be shortened by using flat_map instead of map{..}.flatten. But this way is a bit easier to explain. :) –  davogones May 17 '13 at 4:48

Ok, @sameera207 suggested one way, then I will suggest another way (functional style):

arr1 = [2, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3]
arr2 = [1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 5]

arr1.zip(arr2).flat_map { |n1, n2| [n1] * n2 }
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Rather than use map{ ... }.flatten try flat_map. –  the Tin Man May 17 '13 at 4:05
ids = [2, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3]
repeats = [1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 5]

result = []
ids.count.times do |j|
  repeats[j].times { result << ids[j] }
end
share|improve this answer

This is a one way of doing it:

a = [2,4,5,6,2,3]
b = [1,1,3,3,2,5]
c = []

a.each.with_index do |index, i|
  b[index].to_i.times {c << i }
end
p c
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you use b[index].to_i? Why not b[index] since b only contains integers to begin with? And why each.with_index instead of each_with_index? –  the Tin Man May 17 '13 at 3:57

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