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I currently have this R-script:

library(ggplot2)

png("collatz-max-in-seq.png", width = 512, height = 800)

mydata = read.csv("../collatz-maxNumber.csv")

# Prepare data
p<-ggplot(mydata, aes(x=n, y=maximum))+ scale_y_continuous(formatter = "comma", limits = c(0, 100000))

p<-p + geom_point()
p<-p + opts(panel.background = theme_rect(fill='white', colour='white'))

# This will save the result in a pdf file called Rplots.pdf
p

dev.off()

which produces with collatz-maxNumber.csv:

enter image description here

How can I mark all points that have a power of two as x coordinate?

If such a check is not possible, I could also make another csv file with all x-values that should get marked. Note that I still want to mark points, not the x value itself.

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Note that opts is deprecated in resent versions of ggplot2. You might also be interested in function ggsave. –  Roland May 17 '13 at 9:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This should work. all you need to do is add a column with a value for a colour aesthetic based on whether or not your x value is a power of two. In this example all rows where 'n' is a power of 2 take the value 2 and 1 otherwise:

mydata$col <- ( sqrt(mydata$n) %% 1  == 0 ) + 1

You can then plot this as

#  Plot
ggplot( mydata , aes( x = n ,  y = maximum , colour = factor(col) ) )+
  geom_point()+
  scale_y_continuous( formatter = "comma" , limits = c( 0, 100000 ) )

An example in action....

#  Sample data
mydata <- data.frame( n = rep(1:9,4) , y = sample( 20 , 36 , repl = TRUE ) )

#  Make the colour aesthetic
mydata$col <- ( sqrt(mydata$n) %% 1  == 0 ) + 1

#  Plot!
ggplot( mydata , aes( x = n ,  y = y , colour = factor(col) ) )+
geom_point( )

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
What is factor? –  moose May 17 '13 at 15:46
1  
It makes ggplot treat the 1/2 as categorical rather than a continuous variable (which affects the colour scale). Try removing the factor() and just have colour = col and see how it changes the plot. –  Simon O'Hanlon May 17 '13 at 15:54
    
@moose did it help? –  Simon O'Hanlon May 17 '13 at 18:12
    
Yes, thank you very much! –  moose May 17 '13 at 18:21

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