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I'm using py2exe to convert my GUI application made using wxPython to a standalone single exe file. This is what i'm using in setup.py:

from distutils.core import setup
import py2exe

includes = []
excludes = ['_gtkagg', '_tkagg', 'bsddb', 'curses', 'email', 'pywin.debugger',
        'pywin.debugger.dbgcon', 'pywin.dialogs', 'tcl',
        'Tkconstants', 'Tkinter']
packages = []
dll_excludes = ['libgdk-win32-2.0-0.dll', 'libgobject-2.0-0.dll', 'tcl84.dll',
            'tk84.dll']

setup(
options = {"py2exe": {"compressed": True, 
                      "optimize": 2,
                      "includes": includes,
                      "excludes": excludes,
                      "packages": packages,
                      "dll_excludes": dll_excludes,
                      "bundle_files": 1,
                      "dist_dir": "dist",
                      "skip_archive": False,
                      "ascii": False,
                      "custom_boot_script": '',
                     }
          },
zipfile = None,
windows=['script.py']
)

Everything goes well, but the problem I'm facing is that the UI looks old. It's like the interface of Windows 97 or something. Here's the image:

screenshot

share|improve this question
    
Does it look fine when run directly? If it does, try removing all your excludes and dll_excludes (unless you really need to exclude these), then see if it changes anything. –  jadkik94 May 17 '13 at 11:45
    
It looks fine when run directly. Removed all the excludes and dll_excludes but still nothing. –  Flinzar May 17 '13 at 13:15

2 Answers 2

I have also encountered this problem and found a solution.
To let windows controls looks normal, first you MUST insert manifest to the target executable file, just as here mentions.

manifest = """
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"
manifestVersion="1.0">
<assemblyIdentity
    version="0.64.1.0"
    processorArchitecture="x86"
    name="Controls"
    type="win32"
/>
<description>Your Application</description>
<dependency>
    <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity
            type="win32"
            name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
            version="6.0.0.0"
            processorArchitecture="X86"
            publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
            language="*"
        />
    </dependentAssembly>
</dependency>
</assembly>
"""

setup(
    windows = [
        {
            "script": "yourapplication.py",
            "icon_resources": [(1, "yourapplication.ico")],
            "other_resources": [(24,1,manifest)]
        }
    ],
      data_files=["yourapplication.ico"]
)

Second, you MUST get the corresponding run-time dlls.
To get manifest and dlls, you could download Dropbox and install, and enter the installed folder, use Manifest View to get manifest from Dropbox.exe and dlls from sub-folder Microsoft.VC90.CRT (Keep this folder in your app dist). The following is what I have gotten from Dropbox.exe.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0">
    <asmv3:application xmlns:asmv3="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
        <asmv3:windowsSettings
            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2005/WindowsSettings">
            <dpiAware>true</dpiAware>
        </asmv3:windowsSettings>
    </asmv3:application>
    <assemblyIdentity
        version="2.6.25.0"
        processorArchitecture="X86"
        name="Dropbox"
        type="win32"
        />
    <description>*</description>
    <dependency>
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity
                type="win32"
                name="Microsoft.VC90.CRT"
                version="9.0.30729.1"
                processorArchitecture="x86"
                publicKeyToken="1fc8b3b9a1e18e3b"
                />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity
                type="win32"
                name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
                version="6.0.0.0"
                processorArchitecture="X86"
                publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
                language="*"
                />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </dependency>
</assembly>

Then the target exe runs very well.

share|improve this answer

This script works for me:

from distutils.core import setup

import py2exe

setup(
        options = {'py2exe': {'bundle_files': 1,
                              'dll_excludes': ['w9xpopen.exe'],
                              'excludes': ['pywin', 'pywin.debugger',
                                           'pywin.debugger.dbgcon',
                                           'pywin.dialogs',
                                           'pywin.dialogs.list',
                                           'Tkconstants', 'Tkinter', 'tcl']}},
        windows = [{'script': 'script.py'}],
        zipfile = None,
    )

Maybe you can try if this works for you. Since 'w9xpopen.exe' is only needed for old Windows systems, i.e. Windows 95 and 98, you can add 'dll_excludes': ['w9xpopen.exe']. This might help to solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but doesn't work. –  Flinzar May 26 '13 at 16:42
    
Adding a manifest allows specifying the controls to use wxPython site. version="6.0.0.0" or version="7.0.0.0" should work. –  Mike Müller May 26 '13 at 17:06

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