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I'm seeing an issue where a call to boost's thread->join in a destructor leads to a deadlock. I don't understand why, and I'm not too keen on keeping code that just works (and I don't understand why it does) in the project.

Class declaration (I've stripped the run() method of try/catch for brevity: according to the boost thread documentation, the result should be the same with or without it):

class B 
{
public:
    void operator()(){run();}
    void run();
    void shutdown();
    ~B();
    B();
    boost::thread *thr;
    bool shutdown_requested;
};

void B::shutdown()
{
    shutdown_requested = true;

    if (thr != NULL)
    {
        thr->interrupt();
        thr->join(); // deadlock occurs here!
        delete thr;
        thr = NULL;
    }
}

B::~B()
{
    shutdown();
}

B::B()
{
    thr = new boost::thread(boost::ref(*this));
}

void B::run()
{
    while (!shutdown_requested)
    {
        boost::xtime xt;
        boost::xtime_get(&xt, boost::TIME_UTC);
        xt.sec += 30;
        boost::this_thread::sleep(xt);
    }
}

Snippet which does not work:

int main()
{
    B *b = new B;

    Sleep(5000);
    printf("deleting \n");fflush(stdout);
//    b->shutdown();
    delete b;
    printf("done\n");fflush(stdout);

    return 0;
}

Snippet which works:

int main()
{
    B *b = new B;

    Sleep(5000);
    printf("deleting \n");fflush(stdout);
    b->shutdown();
    delete b;
    printf("done\n");fflush(stdout);

    return 0;
}

I think the reason for this behavior has something to do with this snippet of the boost documentation:

the user of Boost.Thread must ensure that the referred-to object outlives the newly-created thread of execution.

But I don't really understand why the deadlock - joining the thread would not call the destructor on B and the object itself is not deleted when the run() method is supposed to exit.

share|improve this question
1  
Good question, and well-asked. I don't know an answer, but did you have a look into the implementation of boost::thread? Or did you try debugging it? Maybe that gives you a hint. From looking at the example code, I'd say it should work fine. –  MP24 Nov 2 '09 at 13:16
    
Thanks, I found the issue by stepping in the debugger. It was related to leak-detection code. –  laura Nov 2 '09 at 13:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've found the issue: it boils down to an over-zealous programmer.

I had originally compiled my project using DUMA (http://sourceforge.net/projects/duma/) to see if my implementation of the current module was leak-free. Unfortunately, my test sandbox also had the duma settings on, which I did not realize until I stepped through the code in a debugger.

After removing all memory leak-detection, everything works as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that you can accept your own answer to mark your question as answered. –  MP24 Nov 2 '09 at 14:33
    
Only after two days unfortunately. Thanks again for the help –  laura Nov 2 '09 at 14:45

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