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Consider this class

class Duck
  attr_accessor :name

  def initialize(name)
    @name = name || 'Donald'
  end

  # Some quacking methods..

  def to_s
    "#{@name} (Duck)"
  end

end

I would like my duck to respond to methods like upcase, sub, gsub, etc.., so I can do

my_duck = Duck.new("Scrooge")
my_duck.upcase  
   --> "SCROOGE (DUCK)"

Besides manually implementing these methods, is there a nifty way I can pick out String methods that are not self-mutating and automatically have my class respond to those, then call to_s and then call the method on the resulting string?

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3  
Duck#chop, Duck#slice, Duck#squeeze :-) –  Stefan May 17 '13 at 13:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could use the Forwardable module:

require 'forwardable'

class Duck      
  extend Forwardable

  # This defines Duck#upcase and Duck#sub, you can
  # add as many methods as you like.
  def_delegators(:to_s, :upcase, :sub) 

  # All the other code here... 
end

Duck.new('duffy').upcase
# => DUFFY (DUCK)

Duck.new('rubber').respond_to?(:upcase)
# => true

In general calling def_delegators(:foo, :bar) is equivalent to define the bar method by hand like this:

def bar(*args, &block)
  foo.bar(*args, &block)
end

The first argument to def_delegators can be the name of an instance variable, i.e. def_delegators(:@foo, :bar, :baz).

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interesting, but how do you know that it is delegated to the String class? –  poseid May 17 '13 at 12:38
    
@poseid because to_s returns a String. –  toro2k May 17 '13 at 12:38
    
@toro2k: Very cool. –  undur_gongor May 17 '13 at 12:59
    
This is precisely what I wanted. Flexible and explicit, yet concise. Thank you! –  Niels B. May 17 '13 at 13:58

As I understand your question, you would like to have something as a String Module that you could mixin into your Animal classes. However, String is a Class and the only way to access the methods from String would be inheritance on the burden of tight coupling between String and your classes.

If you need to re-use a lot of String manipulations, I would define a module:

module StringMixins
  def upcase
     # see e.g. Rubinius link below 
  end

  # ...
end

and include StringMixins into your target classes. That would look like:

class Duck
  include StringMixins

  # ...
end

Rubinius upcase implementation: https://github.com/rubinius/rubinius/blob/master/kernel/common/string.rb#L735-L738

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You can use the method_missing method to check if the return value of your to_s implementation responds to this method and call it, if this is the case.

  class Duck
    attr_accessor :name

    def initialize(name)
      @name = name || 'Donald'
    end

    # Some quacking methods..

    def to_s
      "#{@name} (Duck)"
    end

    def method_missing(m, *args, &block)
      raise NoMethodError unless self.to_s.respond_to? m
      self.to_s.send(m, *args, &block)
    end

  end

  d = Duck.new "Donald"
  puts d.upcase    # DONALD (DUCK)
  puts d.swapcase  # dONALD (dUCK)
  puts d.downcase  # donald (duck)
  puts d.sub('D') { |m| m.downcase } # donald (Duck)
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting solution that certainly makes it super easy to add in all the String methods. However, I think it has a cost in readability. For instance if you do a duck.methods, you won't see the delegates, which means any respond_to? calls will fail. Furthermore, if you want to add delegation to other sources besides String and to_s, I can imagine the method_missing handler becoming untidy. –  Niels B. May 17 '13 at 14:06
    
These are indeed valid points! –  maerch May 17 '13 at 14:11

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