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I have an extremely basic GLSL program which is failing to properly update a uniform value after the first draw call. No errors are received from glGetError, no errors are reported in the info logs when compiling and linking the shaders, and all uniform locations are valid.

Vertex shader:

#version 120

uniform mat4 mvp;
uniform mat3 nmv;

attribute vec3 position;
attribute vec3 normal;

varying vec3 v_normal;

void main()
{
    v_normal = normalize(nmv * normal);
    gl_Position = mvp * vec4(position, 1.0);
}

Fragment shader:

#version 120

uniform vec3 lightDir;
uniform vec3 lightColor;
uniform vec3 materialColor;

varying vec3 v_normal;

void main()
{
    vec3 n = normalize(v_normal);
    float nDotL = max(0.0, dot(n, lightDir));

    gl_FragColor = vec4(materialColor * lightColor * nDotL, 1.0);
}

Rendering code:

glUseProgram(program);
glUniformMatrix4fv(mvpLoc, 1, GL_FALSE, mvp);
glUniformMatrix3fv(nmvLoc, 1, GL_FALSE, nmv);
glUniform3fv(lightDirLoc, 1, lightDir);
glUniform3fv(lightColorLoc, 1, lightColor);

for (auto mesh: meshes)
{
    glUniform3fv(materialColorLoc, 1, mesh.color);
    mesh.draw();
}

The rendered meshes are all drawn in the color of the first mesh, indicating that after initially setting the materialColor uniform, the subsequent calls to change the uniform are ignored. However, here is a list of special conditions which independently allow the uniform to be updated properly:

  • Calling glUseProgram(program) within the loop.
  • Setting the mvp or the nmv uniforms within the loop.
  • Setting the lightDir uniform within the loop.
  • Removing one of the uniform vec3s from the shader program.

Please note that setting the lightColor uniform within the loop will not update the materialColor uniform. I have also checked GL_CURRENT_PROGRAM within the loop, and the shader remains bound throughout.

I have been trying to fix this for hours and absolutely cannot find the issue. This shader setup is so simple that I don't believe it's a driver bug. I'm using OpenGL 2.1 on Mac OS X 10.8.3 with a NVIDIA GeForce 9400M.

Here is a call trace for a single frame:

glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
glUseProgram(1);
glUniformMatrix4fv(1, 1, 0, 0x7fff55512550); // mvp
glUniformMatrix3fv(5, 1, 0, 0x7fff55512528); // nmv
glUniform3fv(0, 1, 0x7fff55512670);          // lightDir
glUniform3fv(9, 1, 0x7fff555124e8);          // lightColor

// Mesh 0
glUniform3fv(8, 1, 0x7fab820cd7ec);          // materialColor
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 1);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x00000000);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(2);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(2, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x0000000c);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 21);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(0);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(2);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

// Mesh 1
glUniform3fv(8, 1, 0x7fab823000bc);          // materialColor
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 2);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x00000000);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(2);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(2, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x0000000c);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 24);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(0);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(2);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

// Mesh 2
glUniform3fv(8, 1, 0x7fab8231f8fc);          // materialColor
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 3);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x00000000);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(2);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(2, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x0000000c);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 21);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(0);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(2);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

// Mesh 3
glUniform3fv(8, 1, 0x7fab820cf41c);          // materialColor
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 4);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x00000000);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(2);
glVertexAttribPointerARB(2, 3, GL_FLOAT, 0, 24, 0x0000000c);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 18);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(0);
glDisableVertexAttribArray(2);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);
glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

CGLFlushDrawable();

EDIT: Here is the code used to obtain the uniform locations. It is performed after the shaders have been compiled and linked, and all uniforms are verified to be valid.

GLint mvpLoc = glGetUniformLocation(program, "mvp");
GLint nmvLoc = glGetUniformLocation(program, "nmv");
GLint lightDirLoc = glGetUniformLocation(program, "lightDir");
GLint lightColorLoc = glGetUniformLocation(program, "lightColor");
GLint materialColorLoc = glGetUniformLocation(program, "materialColor");
share|improve this question
1  
It seems to me that the only difference between the lightColor and lightDir uniforms is their location in the shader. Have you tried switching their places and seeing if lightColor indeed does trigger the change? I would also try to see if an ATI or Intel GPU produces the same behavior. –  ananthonline May 17 '13 at 16:32
1  
I've just tried switching their order, and the behavior remains exactly the same. lightColor still does not trigger the change. Unfortunately I don't have access to another GPU at this time. –  Chris Howard May 17 '13 at 17:12
1  
I noticed that swapping either the order of declaration, or their positions in the operations resulted in their uniform locations remaining unchanged. –  Chris Howard May 17 '13 at 17:26
1  
Curiouser and curiouser. :) Is it possible for you post a complete working sample I can compile/run on different hardware/driver platforms? Or would it too much work to extract from your current application? –  ananthonline May 17 '13 at 18:07
1  
It would be rather difficult to extract and provide you with a working sample from this application. However if you would like to attempt to duplicate the behavior, you should be able to use the call trace data to perform the exact same operations. –  Chris Howard May 17 '13 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

  1. Sometimes driver will optimize some of your uniforms (even if it should not especialy with older drivers). to test that try to use your material color in vertex shader (copy it to some varying variable and in fragment shader use that varying variable instead of uniform, that sometimes works for me,... of course it lower performance a bit)

  2. try to use different profile version. In some cases newer drivers do not emulate older versions properly. Had you try core profile ? (i know its very tricky to implement with older code)

  3. you can try nvemulate to test different driver settings

sometimes forgotten glEnd(); makes a lot of trouble try to add this code before your frame rendering code:

glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
glEnd();
... here comes your rendering code

if this helps than you forgott to call glEnd(); somewhere or have glEnd; instead of glEnd();

share|improve this answer
1  
A glEnd problem would have triggered a GL error, which the OP states to have checked. –  rotoglup Aug 5 '13 at 7:49

Still not solved?

what is the type of mesh.color

looking at the addresses passed into the call trace they seem rather high, perhaps you should be passing in an address to the data not the actual data, 0x7fab823000bc

glUniform3fv(materialColorLoc, 1, &mesh.color); perhaps try hard coding and using glUniform3f()

share|improve this answer

I don't understand why you use uniform to set color of mesh. Shaders have some built-in variables which you can set from your code and use in shader. It is much simpler to use glMaterialfv() in program and gl_FrontMaterial in shader.

Program:

...
//Set material diffuse color of mesh
GLfloat color[] = { 1, 1, 1, 1 } //RGBA -> white color
glMaterialfv(GL_FRONT, GL_DIFFUSE, color);
...

Shader:

...
//Get material color
vec4 diffuseColor = gl_FrontMaterial.diffuse;
gl_FragColor = vec4(materialColor * lightColor * nDotL, 1.0);
...

Here is struct of gl_FrontMaterial:

struct gl_MaterialParameters {
    vec4 emission;
    vec4 ambient;
    vec4 diffuse;
    vec4 specular;
    float shininess;
};

I have no idea what a magic is glUniform3fv(8, 1, 0x7fab8231f8fc); because the last parameter must be array of 3 elements and this is just number. My compiler throws error if I write this so I don't understand how can you use this line in program. I think it must be like this:

//Don't use hard code locations
GLint loc = glGetUniformLocation(mGlobalProgram->mProgramID, "materialColor");
//Use array of float or int ... what do u want but no "0x7fab820cd7ec"
GLfloat color[] = { 0.5, 0.6, 1.0 };
//Set uniform
glUniform3fv(loc, 1, color);

Everything is strange in your code. Tell me if I am wrong. Thanks.

share|improve this answer

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