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The following code snippet does not test oddity correctly:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
   return i % 2 == 1;
}

I read in the web that I should do it the following way:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
   return i % 2 != 0;
}

Why is this?

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hmmm using modulo operation to test parity is a bit excessive –  Danubian Sailor May 17 '13 at 14:20
2  
Quite importantly, java does not have a modulo operator. % is the remainder operator. docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/… –  djeikyb May 17 '13 at 22:51
1  
What is the difference between modulo and remainder operator? –  gg.kaspersky Jul 17 '13 at 14:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Might be because (i % 2) != 0 works for both positive and negative numbers

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3  
good answer but () are redundant as operator precedence says I mean you can ignore it –  Grijesh Chauhan May 17 '13 at 12:50
30  
I don't doubt you, @GrijeshChauhan, but I find it easier to use () a lot so that I don't have to remember what all the operator precedence rules are across all the languages that I've learned in my life! I think it also helps readability because it removes any doubt for people who're in the same position as me :-). –  Stochastically May 17 '13 at 12:53
    
Yes Agree, () is for overwrite operators precedence only & Why to remember :) –  Grijesh Chauhan May 17 '13 at 12:56

Because when i is negative --> (-1) % 2 == -1

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You should use:

(i & 1) != 0

to avoid sign issues.

Also note that using & ensures that however stupid the compiler is it will never attempt to use a division to achieve the % operation.

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2  
i % 1 is always 0. –  fgb May 17 '13 at 13:14
    
agreed, i % 1 is always 0 –  Stochastically May 17 '13 at 13:27
1  
I have no idea about java but in C (i & 1) will be much faster also... –  Grady Player May 17 '13 at 18:55
3  
@GradyPlayer "will" is pretty strong; data or it didn't happen. A quick test says Debian's GCC 4.4.5 on AMD64 produces identical assembly for (i & 1) != 0 and (i % 2) != 0. #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { volatile int i = 1; volatile int j = (i & 1) != 0; printf("%d", j); return j; } (and same with i%2 instead of i&1). cc -S and diff -u says the only difference is the .file directive (because I made one file for each). –  Michael Kjörling May 17 '13 at 23:41
2  
@GradyPlayer: -O0 basicly means no optimization. Which is good for debugging but choosing it as a baseline of benchmarks is... questionable to say at least. –  Maciej Piechotka May 18 '13 at 0:49

The first snippet would work correct if the modulo operator were to be replaced by bitwise-and operator:

public static boolean isOdd(int i) {
   return (i & 1) == 1;
}
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(i & 1) == 1 I guess... –  Honza Brabec May 17 '13 at 13:07
    
yes, (i & 1) == 1 –  devnull May 17 '13 at 13:10
3  
correct, and much cheaper than modulo –  Danubian Sailor May 17 '13 at 14:20

This has to do with the way modulo works in Java. If i is negative the answer will be negative as well. Every negative input will return false.

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